Abbott questioned whether he would outlaw birth control or emergency contraception

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An “undercover” reporter pressured Texas Governor Greg Abbott over whether he would outlaw emergency contraception and birth control medication after the approval of the nation’s most restrictive abortion law.

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Lauren Windsor, executive director of the political advocacy organization American Family Voices and a reporter for the web series The Undercurrent, introduced herself as a “huge admirer” of the governor during an event on October 11, asking “what else could be done”. could.”

“Can you do something about the morning after pills and birth control, because I think it’s destroying the very fabric of our society, encouraging women,” Ms Windsor asked the governor .

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In his response, the governor appeared to mix emergency contraception – which is legal and available in the state – with abortion-inducing drugs, which Mr Abbott has sought to ban from mailing in the state.

The governor also said he signed a “trigger law” that creates a statewide ban on abortion if the US Supreme Court overturns the landmark ruling. weed weed, which provides constitutional protections for women’s health care without waiting for state legislative action.

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“So basically, we outlawed abortion in Texas,” he said in the video.

When pressed “anything you can do to move forward”, including banning over-the-counter emergency contraception, he replied: “I don’t know. What I don’t know.”

Granthshala Comment has been sought from the Governor’s office.

The US Justice Department on Monday urged a federal appeals court to halt the implementation of the state’s recent abortion law, which bans abortions in the state after six weeks of pregnancy — before many people even know they are pregnant. – including cases of rape or incest.

The Justice Department’s motion follows a three-judge panel’s decision to temporarily reinstate the law, placing an administrative stay on the lower court’s injunction while it considers the state’s arguments in legal challenges.

Governor Abbott signed another measure into law that prohibits health providers from sending abortion-inducing medication to patients who are more than seven weeks pregnant — below 10 weeks. The Food and Drug Administration established in 2016 that such a drug is safe for use up to 70 days or 10 weeks after conception.

None of the state’s laws ban birth control or emergency contraception, such as the “morning-after” pill, which the FDA approved for over-the-counter purchase in 2013.

But the new laws have fueled concerns among health experts already battling a flood of misinformation and raised fears among Texans about whether the new measures could affect their access to health care, including birth control. and other medicines. Reporting from Buzzfeed News.

American conservatives armed with propaganda campaigns and anti-abortion activists have long mixed abortion-inducing drugs with prescription birth control and contraception.

In 2014, the Supreme Court sided with anti-abortion activists to stop for-profit companies – citing religious objections – from paying for birth control to their health care systems, which they falsely believed were abortion-inducing drugs. Was.

Last year, the nation’s High Court allowed insurers to offer no-cost birth control to allow employers to opt out of an Affordable Care Act mandate, citing religious objections to Donald Trump’s administration as well as .

This year, GOP lawmakers in Missouri sought to ban Medicaid from covering emergency contraceptives and intrauterine devices—which they unfairly compared to abortion.

Texas – which has the ninth highest rate of teen pregnancy in the US – is one of only two states where the state child insurance program does not cover contraceptives to prevent pregnancy for low-income teens, According to Texas Tribune.

The state program makes exceptions for teens seeking birth control for medical issues such as anemia, endometriosis and heavy periods, although the state requires a comprehensive review to verify that the drug was not used to prevent pregnancy. He is going.

Credit: www.independent.co.uk / Greg Abbott

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