The doctor dropped a miniature camera into the patient’s right nostril, causing his entire nose to turn bright red.

“A little tickling, eh?” When she asked that she was stopping around her nasal passage, she felt tears in her eyes and caressed her cheeks.

The patient, Gabriella Forgion, did not have a complaint. The 25-year-old pharmacy worker was happy to be hospitalized and hospitalized in Nice, southern France, to pursue her growing pressure to heal her sense of smell. With a sense of taste, it suddenly vanished when she fell ill with COVID-19 in November, and neither returned.

February 8, 2021: dr.  Claire Vanderstein, right, during a test at a hospital in Nice, southern France, helps detect the smell of a tube under the nose of a patient, Gabriela Forgione, to help determine that she was unable to smell Yes or No.  In November 2020, it signed COVID-19.

February 8, 2021: dr. Claire Vanderstein, right, during a test at a hospital in Nice, southern France, helps detect the smell of a tube under the nose of a patient, Gabriela Forgione, to help determine that she was unable to smell Yes or No. In November 2020, it signed COVID-19.
(AP Photo / John Leicester)

Being deprived of the pleasures of food and the aroma of the things she loves are proving hard on her body and mind. Both the good and bad thorns of the omen, Forgion are losing weight and confidence.

After receiving FAUCI’s findings, unless released

“Sometimes I ask myself, ‘Do I smell?” “She confesses.” Generally, I wear perfumes and like to smell good things. Can’t bother me too much. “

One year into the coronovirus pandemic, doctors and researchers are still trying to understand and treat the epidemic better with COVID-19-related anosmia – loss of smell – from a growing number of sensory dulls Plenty of enjoyment of life. Sufferers like Forgione.

Even specialist doctors say that there is much about the condition that they still do not know and they are learning as they go along in their diagnosis and treatment. With COVID-19 odor changes and changes have become so common Some researchers suggest In countries with some laboratories simple odor tests can be used to track coronovirus infection.

For most people, olfactory problems are temporary, often improving on their own in weeks. But a small minority continues to complain of dysfunction long after other COVID-19 symptoms have disappeared. Some have sustained a total or partial loss of smell Six months after infection. For the longest time, some doctors say, now a full year is coming.

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Researchers working on waxing disabilities say they are optimistic that most will eventually recover but some will not fear. Some doctors are concerned that an increasing number of odor-deprived patients, many of them young, may be more prone to depression and other difficulties and weigh on stressful health systems.

“They are losing color in their lives,” said Dr. Thomas Thomas, who heads the clinic for smell and taste patients at University Hospital in Dresden, Germany.

“These people will survive and they will be successful in their lives, in their businesses”, he said. “But his life will be very poor.”

At the Face and Neck University Institute in Nice, Drs. Claire Vanderstein closed the tube after a tube of tubes under Forgione’s nose had been rooted in her nose with her camera.

February 8, 2021: A researcher placed one of the small pots of fragrance used during testing at a clinic in Nice, France.

February 8, 2021: A researcher placed one of the small pots of fragrance used during testing at a clinic in Nice, France.
(AP Photo / John Leicester)

“Do you feel any smell? Nothing? Zero? Alright,” he asked, as he answered negatively, repeatedly and with an apology.

Only the last tube evoked an uneven response.

“Urgh! Oh, that stinks,” Forgione shouted. “fish!”

The test completed, Vanderstein gave his diagnosis.

“You need a great deal of smell to be able to smell something,” he told her. “You have not completely lost your sense of smell, but neither is it good.”

He Shipped him with homework: six months of olfactory rehabilitation. Twice, select two or three fragrant things, such as lavender or jars of fragrance, and sniff them for two to three minutes, he ordered.

“If you smell something, great. If not, no problem. Try again, lavender, focusing on a beautiful purple blooming picture,” he said. “You have to be firm.”

Losing a sense of smell can be more than just an inconvenience. Smoke from dangerous fires, gas leaks, or the smell of rotten food can be dangerous to anyone. Smoke from used diapers, dog dirt on shoes or an armpit filled with sweat can be embarrassingly ignored.

And as poets have long known, scents and emotions are often like lovers.

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Ivan Sessa enjoyed meal times. Now they are doing a housework. In September, a fish meal that suddenly seemed tasteless was first flagged off to an 18-year-old sports student that COVID-19 blew her senses. Foods became merely textures with only residual hints of sweet and salty.

Five months later, snacking on chocolate cookies before classes, Sessa still chews without joy, as if swallowing cardboard.

“Eating is no longer a purpose for me,” he said. “It’s just a waste of time.”

Sesa is one of the patients suffering from anosmia that was studied by researchers in Nice, who used scents in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease before the epidemic. He used a soothing fragrance for post-treatment stress among children following a truck terror attack in Nice in 2016 The driver pledged through the holiday crowd, Killing 86 people.

Researchers are now turning their expertise to COVID-19, teaming with the perfume of the nearby fragrance-producing city of Grasse. Perfumer Oude Galloué worked on scented waxes that were pressed under Cesa’s nose to measure their olfactory loss, with scents in varying concentrations.

“The sense of smell is a feeling that is fundamentally forgotten,” Galoye said. “We don’t realize its effect except on our lives, when we no longer have it.”

Examinations on Sesa and other patients also include language and attention tests. Good researchers are finding that olfactory complaints are associated with cognitive difficulties associated with COVID, including problems with focusing. When “kayak” was the obvious choice on a test, the word “ship” faltered when it took the lead.

“It’s completely unexpected,” said Magali Payne, a speech therapist on the team. “This youth should not face linguistic problems.”

“We’ll have to keep digging,” he said. “As we are seeing patients we are finding out things.”

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Sesa rested for a long time, restoring her senses, to run through the flavors of pasta in carbonara sauce, her favorite dish and the aromatic wonders of the great outdoors.

“One might think that being able to smell nature, trees, forests is not important,” he said. “But when you lose your sense of smell, you realize how lucky we are to be able to smell these things.”