Amateur astronomers capture the moment mysterious object slams into Jupiter and causes bright flash lasting two seconds

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  • Amateur Astronomers Captured a Bright Impact Flash on Jupiter This Week
  • They are a bright light that stays in the planet’s atmosphere for up to two seconds.
  • If this impact had been there, it would have been only the eighth impact recorded on Jupiter.

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A mysterious object collided with Jupiter this week, producing a bright flash of light that amateur astronomers captured 382.76 million miles from Earth.

German astronomer Harald Paleske was observing the shadow of Jupiter’s moon, Io, creating a solar eclipse in the planet’s atmosphere of Jupiter, when he observed a possible impact.

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‘A bright flash of light startled me,’ he said space weather. ‘It can only be an effect.’

If confirmed, it would be the eighth recorded impact on the gas giant – first identified in 1994.

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After seeing the bright flash, Paleske said he watched each frame with the hope of determining what caused the light.

They found that the flash was in Jupiter’s atmosphere and remained visible for two seconds – ruling out any interference from Earth or a random satellite floating on the planet.

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German astronomer Harald Paleske was looking at the shadow of Jupiter’s moon, Io (left circle), creating a solar eclipse in the planet’s atmosphere of Jupiter when he observed a possible impact

Jupiter is hit by dozens, perhaps hundreds, of asteroids every year, as the giant planet acts as a blockade to prevent such objects from impacting Earth.

However, capturing such an event is very rare.

Another amateur astronomer in Brazil also documented the event.

Jose Luis Pereira set up his instruments in So Caetano do Sul in Brazil’s southeastern state of So Paulo on September 12 and pointed the gear to Jupiter.

Pereira shared, “To my surprise, in the first video I saw a different glow on the planet, but I didn’t pay much attention to it because I thought it might be something related to the parameters adopted, and I normally Keep watching,” Pereira shared. in an email to Space.com.

‘Because of the fear of worsening weather conditions, I didn’t watch the first video to prevent capture.’

Jose Luis Pereira set up his instruments and pointed the gear to Jupiter at So Caetano do Sul in the southeastern state of So Paulo, Brazil, on September 12.  He then sent the information to Marc Delcroix of the French Astronomical Society, who confirmed that the phenomenon seen in the footage was an impact.  And it's on Monday at 6:39 p.m. EDT.  happened on

Jose Luis Pereira set up his instruments and pointed the gear to Jupiter at So Caetano do Sul in the southeastern state of So Paulo, Brazil, on September 12. He then sent the information to Marc Delcroix of the French Astronomical Society, who confirmed that the phenomenon seen in the footage was an impact. And it’s on Monday at 6:39 p.m. EDT. happened on

“I only checked the results on the morning of the 14th, when the program alerted me of the high probability of impact and verified that the first video of the night did indeed contain a record,” Pereira wrote.

He then sent the information to Marc Delcroix of the French Astronomical Society, who confirmed that the phenomenon seen in the footage was an impact.

And it happened at 6:39 p.m. EDT on Monday.

The first recorded impact on Jupiter was Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) which hit in July 1994.

Jupiter is the focus of many amateur skygazers and professional astronomers, all hoping to uncover the secrets of the gas giant.

Last month, scientists at the University of Leicester teamed up with NASA to create heat maps of Jupiter and found that intense auroras are driving extreme temperatures, despite covering only less than 10 percent of the planet.

The team set out to understand how far from the Sun a planet must be at about 163 degrees Fahrenheit, yet the gas giant’s atmosphere is 798 degrees Fahrenheit.

They found that charged particles that ejected from Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io are captured by the planet’s magnetic field, which in turn produces ultraviolet auroras.

Last month, scientists at the University of Leicester teamed up with NASA to create heat maps of Jupiter and found that intense auroras are driving extreme temperatures, despite covering only less than 10 percent of the planet.

Last month, scientists at the University of Leicester teamed up with NASA to create heat maps of Jupiter and found that intense auroras are driving extreme temperatures, despite covering only less than 10 percent of the planet.

Models of the gas giants of the atmosphere suggest that the auroras act like a giant refrigerator, with heat energy drawn from the equator to the poles radiating across pole regions into the lower atmosphere.

These new findings suggest that rapidly changing aurorae can drive waves of energy against this polar flow, allowing heat to reach the equator.

A researcher at Japan’s JAXA space agency and lead author of the study, Dr.

The signal wasn’t bright enough at the time to reveal anything outside Jupiter’s polar regions, but with the lessons learned from that work we’ll be able to gain safe timing a few years later on one of the largest, most competitive telescopes on Earth. succeeded in

They found that charged particles that escape from Jupiter's volcanic moon Io are captured by the planet's magnetic field, which in turn produces ultraviolet auroras.

They found that charged particles that escape from Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io are captured by the planet’s magnetic field, which in turn produces ultraviolet auroras.

‘Using the Keck telescope, we produced temperature maps of extraordinary detail. We found that temperatures start much higher within the aurora than expected from previous work, but now we can see that Jupiter’s aurora, despite occupying less than 10% of the planet’s area, appears to be heating the whole thing .

There are light shows similar to Earth, known as the aurora borealis and australis (or commonly known as the northern and southern lights), which are formed when the ions of the solar wind form atoms of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere. collide with.

However, Jupiter’s cosmic phenomena are driven by its volcanic moon, Io, and produce the most powerful auroras in the Solar System.

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