‘And now for the woke weather report’: GMB viewers are not convinced as Laura Tobin breaks down in tears over melting glaciers in the North Pole – and ask why she ‘had to fly to Norway to report on the climate crisis’

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  • ITV’s Weatherwoman Laura Tobin, 39, cried in tears on TODAY Live On Air
  • GMB correspondent reporting from Svalbard near the North Pole
  • She cried as she talked about the impact of global warming on glaciers
  • She said her four-year-old daughter Charlotte had photographed her with the polar bear

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It was an emotional weather report today for Good Morning Britain’s Laura Tobin as she showed the impact of climate change on the North Pole.

Laura, 39, was giving an exclusive live report from Svalbard, the Norwegian archipelago between mainland Norway and the North Pole, which is known for its glaciers.

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The presenter was explaining how the melting of Svalbard affected the rest of the world and Britain when she suddenly broke down in tears.

Visibly shaken, Laura explained that she was thinking of her four-year-old daughter, Charlotte, who she hadn’t seen for six days, and who had photographed her a polar bear before the trip.

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Laura said she didn’t know if there would be polar bears in the area until the time of Charlotte’s age.

The audience was divided by the segment, with some expressing sympathy, while others claiming that Laura was trying to ‘wake up’.

Good Morning Britain weather correspondent Laura Tobin, 39, pictured, breaks down in tears during a live segment on TODAY from Svalbard, Norway

The segment began as usual for Laura, speaking with a confident smile in front of a glacier.

“We’ve come here because Svalbard is warming and hotter than anywhere else on Earth, and the worldwide impact is huge,” she said.

‘We need ice because it helps cool our planet. The weather here and the fact that the ice is melting, disrupting the jet-stream and changing the weather in the UK, with melting ice raising the sea level, which will lead to flooding in the UK.

‘And the sight of the changing landscape here and its impact on ecosystems and wildlife before our eyes has been breathtaking and devastating.’

The presenter started crying as she said she didn't know if her four-year-old daughter Charlotte would ever get to see a polar bear in the North Pole

The presenter started crying as she said she didn’t know if her four-year-old daughter Charlotte would ever get to see a polar bear in the North Pole

The audience felt for Laura but others said that the problem started at the top and that giving up using cars was not the solution.

The audience felt for Laura but others said that the problem started at the top and that giving up using cars was not the solution.

At this point, Laura’s voice began to crack and she struggled to contain herself.

‘I came here, been away from Charlotte for six days,’ she said, fighting back tears, ‘my producer Ruth hasn’t seen her daughter, she’s never taken a night away from her.

‘And I wanted to come here and tell the story of the people here because it’s not really a story but a reality.’

She brandished a piece of paper showing a picture from Charlotte to the camera.

“And my little Charlotte took this picture here, a picture of a polar bear talking to a polar bear,” she said.

“But if Charlotte comes here at my age, there likely won’t be polar bears,” she said.

Laura begins the segment confidently, talking to the audience about the impact of melting ice caps on Britain

Laura begins the segment confidently, talking to the audience about the impact of melting ice caps on Britain

Halfway through, the presenter's voice breaks and she begins to cry, clearly influenced by the reality of climate change.

Halfway through, the presenter’s voice breaks and she begins to cry, clearly affected by the reality of climate change.

Svalbard is an archipelago located between Norway and the North Pole, known for its glaciers and rugged landscape.

Svalbard is an archipelago located between Norway and the North Pole, known for its glaciers and rugged landscape.

‘You know, we were all talking about what we could do. Just understanding the reality and making everyone different and everyone working together and not pointing a finger will help,’ she said.

She concluded by saying that even though she was crying, she had enjoyed her time in Svalbard and would like to return one day.

Susanna Reed and Richard Madley presenting the TODAY show were moved by Laura’s tears.

Susanna said, “You said that sometimes people go to a particular place for a few days and stay for years, because they are so compelled by what they see and can do.”

Charlotte bursts into tears as she shows the camera a picture of a polar bear from her daughter Charlotte, pic

Charlotte bursts into tears as she shows the camera a picture of a polar bear from her daughter Charlotte, pic

‘I know Charlotte means you’re gonna come back. Otherwise, Laura, we will put you at risk of staying there longer because it is such an important job.’

Laura, who was overcome with tears, nodded and said that Charlotte understood why she went to Svalbard.

‘ She said, “The snow is melting” and I said “Why?” And she said “because the earth is warming”, recalled proud mom Laura.

‘ And I said to him “Why?” And he replied “Because we are driving our cars to the shops”.

She concluded, ‘I want to tell her that we did everything we could to make sure this scenario stayed the same for her.

That moment left the audience divided between those who felt for Laura and others who said she was being ‘wake up’.

Some viewers said that Laura's segment had a greater impact on them than the previous moment in the show, where the leader of Insulate Britain tried to justify M25's protest from yesterday

Some viewers said that Laura’s segment had a greater impact on them than the previous moment in the show, where the leader of Insulate Britain tried to justify M25’s protest from yesterday

‘Oh Laura,’ said one.

‘And now wake up to the weather,’ wrote another.

‘Living in Svalbard introduces you to nature and what is happening in the real world – most of us are so isolated from our natural environment that we do not understand the gravity of the crisis we are facing. If we did, we would be crying too,’ wrote one.

‘I’m sorry Laura is upset with @GMB but the problem of climate change starts at the top. What compels people to get out of their cars? It’s fine in London, Manchester, Edinburgh. Go to a rural place and you will hardly see any transport. All the garbage left on festivals etc.,’ said another.

‘As much as I disagree with Laura flying there, that last little segment has made a greater impression on me than the man I ever was before. Absolutely heartfelt and not opposed to people,’ said one.

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