Arrived! NASA’s $10 billion James Webb Telescope  that can unlock some of the universe’s greatest secrets comes on shore in French Guiana after 16-day sea journey

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  • The James Webb Telescope arrived in French Guiana on Tuesday, ahead of its December 18 launch
  • The $10 billion telescope made a 16-day voyage aboard MN Kolibrik
  • After landing, it will be taken to its launch site and will undergo two months of preparation before being launched into space.
  • The telescope is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, which has operated for 31 years
  • When activated, it will be the largest, most powerful and complex space telescope

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After several delays and cost overruns, the James Webb Space Telescope is almost ready to go into space.

The $10 billion telescope, Hubble’s successor, arrived in French Guiana on Tuesday after a 16-day voyage aboard MN Colibri.

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The 1,500-mile journey saw the telescope depart from the Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach in California on 26 September, entering the Panama Canal on 5 October, before making its way to Port de Pariacabo, French Guiana.

After unloading from the cargo ship, it will be flown to its launch site in Kourou, French Guiana, where it will undergo two months of preparation before being launched into space on an Ariane 5 rocket on December 18.

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The $10 Billion James Webb Space Telescope Is Almost Ready to Go into Orbit After Arriving in South America

The $10 billion telescope, Hubble's successor, arrived in French Guiana on Tuesday after a 16-day voyage aboard MN Colibri (pictured).

The $10 billion telescope, Hubble’s successor, arrived in French Guiana on Tuesday after a 16-day sea voyage aboard MN Colibri (pictured).

The 1,500-mile journey saw it leaving Telescope Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach on 26 September, entering the Panama Canal on 5 October, before making its way to Port de Pariacabo, French Guiana.

The 1,500-mile journey saw it leaving Telescope Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach on 26 September, entering the Panama Canal on 5 October, before making its way to Port de Pariacabo, French Guiana.

JWST is a joint project between NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Canadian Space Agency, CSA.

This will allow astronomers to look further back into the history of the universe than ever before.

“The James Webb Space Telescope is a colossal achievement, designed to transform our view of the universe and provide amazing science,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said in a statement. Statement.

Webb will look at the light created more than 13 billion years after the big bang, which will have the power to show humanity the farthest reaches of space we have ever seen. Thanks to the skills and expertise of our phenomenal team, we are now much closer to uncovering the mysteries of the universe.

Looking back more than 13 billion years, astronomers hope that JWST will be able to detect light from some of the first stars in the universe.

Looking back more than 13 billion years, astronomers hope that JWST will be able to detect light from some of the first stars in the universe.

In June, a NASA spokesperson told DailyMail.com that a launch would take place ‘no earlier than October 31’.

Looking back more than 13 billion years, astronomers expect that JWST will be able to detect light from some of the first stars in the universe, widely believed to be about 13.8 billion years old.

Although it is often billed as a successor to Hubble, Marcia Riecke, a Regents professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory, believes it is an ‘entirely new and different animal’.

“The Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes have revolutionized our understanding of the universe,” he said in a separate statement.

‘But with Webb, we will be able to probe galaxies closer to the Big Bang than ever before.’

The telescope will observe the universe in the near-infrared and mid-infrared – at wavelengths longer than visible light.

To do this, it has a suite of state-of-the-art cameras, spectrographs and coronagraphs.

It has the largest astronomical mirror ever sent into space, which is a massive 21 ft 4 in.

The mirror is protected by a five-layer sunshield, which NASA previously said, ‘is designed to keep Webb’s mirrors and scientific instruments cool by blocking infrared light from Earth, the Moon and the Sun.’

It has the largest astronomical mirror ever sent into space, a 21 ft 4 in behemoth.

It has the largest astronomical mirror ever sent into space, a 21 ft 4 in behemoth.

The telescope is currently in a bent state and engineers would like to ensure that it is not damaged in transit.

“We don’t have the equipment to do any deployment here, so we’ll be limited to just switch-on and electrical checks to see if everything is OK,” said Peter Rumler, ESA’s project manager. BBC News.

Engineers began their assembly on the telescope in 2013 at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

NASA recently revealed the James Webb Space Telescope's giant mirror 'like a piece of origami artwork' for one last time before its launch later this year.

NASA recently revealed the James Webb Space Telescope’s giant mirror ‘like a piece of origami artwork’ for one last time before its launch later this year.

In 2017, it was shipped to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston for cryogenic testing and a year later, it was sent to the California Space Park after three years of testing.

After the telescope is removed from the shipping container and a final check on its position is run, it will be configured for flight and then placed on top of an Ariane 5 rocket before being attached for launch.

‘Now that Webb has arrived in Kourou, we’re preparing it to launch in December – and then we’ll watch in suspense over the next few weeks and months as we launch and build the largest space telescope ever built, ‘ said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

According to NASA Program Director Greg Robinson, when the telescope makes its final orbit at a distance of

According to NASA Program Director Greg Robinson, when the telescope makes its final orbit at a distance of “one million miles from Earth”, it will be the largest and most powerful telescope ever sent into space.

The Ariane 5 rocket will propel the telescope directly into a precise transfer orbit toward its destination, the second Lagrange point (L2).

A Lagrange point sits between two large orbiting bodies, in which case the Sun and the Earth and L2 sit at the center of the two bodies.

After separating from the launcher, Webb will continue its four-week-long journey to L2 alone, before being installed and beginning observations.

L2 is about 932,000 miles (1.5 million km) from Earth, four times as far from the Moon in the direction away from the Sun.

When it reaches its final position in orbit, ‘a million miles from Earth,’…

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