BBC presenter Alex Scott, 36, reveals she’s being pressured by friends to freeze her eggs and is asked why she’s single ‘all the time’

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Since competing in Strictly Come Dancing in 2019, her career has skyrocketed.

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And footballer and TV presenter Alex Scott, 36, has now revealed that he is being pressured by friends to freeze his eggs, and constantly goes ‘back-and-forth’ with the idea, explaining that therapy can help him. Still working.

gracing the October cover of women’s HealthThe former footballer also admitted that she is asked why she is ‘alone all the time’.

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Candid: Alex Scott, 36, has now revealed that he is being pressured by friends to freeze his eggs, and constantly goes ‘back-and-forth’ with the idea, explaining that therapy is helping him

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On the subject of freezing his eggs, Alex told the publication: ‘It’s still something I go back and forth with.

‘Sometimes, my friends pressure me: “Alex, you’re not getting younger, you need to do this.”

‘But right now, I’m loving life – so why put pressure on yourself because other people are saying it’s time to freeze your eggs?’

Discussing the positive impact of therapy, Alex said: ‘Going to therapy was the most enlightening thing I’ve ever done in my life. I love this I will never stop.

Cover Star: Grabbing the October cover of Women's Health, the former footballer also admitted that she gets asked why she is single 'all the time'.

Cover Star: Grabbing the October cover of Women’s Health, the former footballer also admitted that she gets asked why she is single ‘all the time’.

Pressure: 'Sometimes, my friends put pressure on me:

Pressure: ‘Sometimes, my friends pressure me: “Alex, you ain’t getting any younger, you need to do this”, reveals star

loving life!  'But right now, I'm loving life - so why put the pressure on yourself because other people are saying it's time to freeze your eggs?'  asked alex

loving life! ‘But right now, I’m loving life – so why put the pressure on yourself because other people are saying it’s time to freeze your eggs?’ asked alex

‘Medicine is helping me, so why am I not going to talk about it’ [freezing her eggs]? With a woman’s decision to freeze her eggs – you do it for yourself, plan ahead, why be ashamed of it?

‘Its [about] Removing the stigma that other people put on you. I get that all the time: “Why are you single?” Like, sorry, do I have to be with someone?! [laughs].

‘On my vacation days, I just want to hang out with my girlfriends, go out to theater shows, listen to music, or have a couple of wines. I am not going to apologize for being single.’

Take ownership!  'With a woman's decision to freeze her eggs - you do it for yourself, plan ahead, why be ashamed of it?'  asked the former footballer

Take ownership! ‘With a woman’s decision to freeze her eggs – you do it for yourself, plan ahead, why be ashamed of it?’ asked the former footballer

Solo!  'I get that all the time:

Solo! ‘I get that all the time: “Why are you single?” Like, sorry, do I have to be with someone?! [laughs]…I won’t apologize for being single’

Alex will soon appear in a new series of Who Do You Think You Are? As the show returns on BBC One this October.

The broadcaster traced Jewish ancestry to his mother’s side and learned that his great-grandfather faced fascism in London’s East End in 1936.

She travels to Jamaica to uncover the history on the other side of the family and learn of tremendous hardship and suffering, as well as some uncomfortable and disturbing history.

Read the full Alex Scott interview in the October issue of Women’s Health UK, on ​​sale from 14 September 2021, also available as a digital version.

Looking back: Alex learns of his Jewish and Jamaican heritage, and the tremendous hardships the ancestors faced in a new series of Who Do You Think?

Looking back: Alex learns of his Jewish and Jamaican heritage, and the tremendous hardships the ancestors faced in a new series of Who Do You Think?

To Freeze Eggs Or Not To Freeze? All the pros and cons for women in their 30s

An increasing number of women have frozen their eggs in recent years as part of the decision to suspend motherhood and pursue a career.

Some women choose to freeze their eggs to preserve their fertility, increasing their chances of having a baby in their thirties and forties.

Others do so because they are receiving treatments, such as chemotherapy, which may be toxic to their ovaries or eggs, or have underlying conditions that can harm their fertility.

Here, MailOnline explains the pros and cons of freezing your eggs.

Shortcoming

One of the major drawbacks is the cost of egg-freezing.

On average, females have to fork out £3,350 to collect and freeze their eggs. The cost of the medicine involved in getting pregnant with an egg is up to £1,500, while storage is up to £350 per year.

And it costs an average of £2,500 to thaw the eggs and transfer them to the womb.

Even an expensive procedure is not a guarantee of success.

According to the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority, the birth rate when using frozen eggs is on the rise, but one in five.

This is compared to a 30 percent success rate during IVF using ‘fresh’ eggs, which are harvested at the time of the procedure.

professionals

The main benefit of egg-freezing is that it takes the pressure off women’s biological clock and gives them flexibility on motherhood.

‘Standard’ IVF using a woman’s own eggs that are harvested for use does not provide a solution to age-related fertility decline over time because it cannot reverse the degeneration of the eggs that can be used as they grow older. comes with.

It also gives women more options than simply freezing an embryo — an egg that has been fertilized before freezing — if a woman who doesn’t yet know who she would like to have a baby with.

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