Biden says getting vaccinated ‘gigantically important’


President Joe Biden expressed disappointment at the slow COVID-19 vaccination rate in the US and requested that it is “very important” for Americans to step up and get vaccinated against the virus as it rises once again.

Biden, speaking at a televised town hall in Cincinnati on Wednesday night, said the public health crisis had largely turned into the plight of the illiterate as the spread of the Delta variant increased infections nationwide.

“We have a pandemic for people who haven’t vaccinated — it’s so basic, so simple,” he said at the CNN town hall.

The President also expressed hope that children under 12 years of age would be approved for vaccination in the coming months. But he displayed displeasure that so many deserving Americans are still reluctant to get a shot.

“If you’re vaccinated, you won’t be hospitalized, you won’t be in an IC unit, and you’re not going to die,” Biden said on stage at Mount St. Joseph’s University. “So it’s very important that … we all act like Americans who care about our fellow Americans.”

In more than 80 minutes, Biden raised questions on several key issues of the day, including his infrastructure package, voting rights and the makeup of the Congressional commission that investigated the January 6 uprising in the Capitol. He also reflected on what it’s like to be president, saying that he is sometimes amazed by the pomp that comes with the job and the burden of being “the last man in the room” to call on challenging decisions. is left for.

Six months into his presidency, his biggest problem remains to tame the coronavirus.

US hospitalizations and deaths are almost all among those uninsured. But cases of COVID-19 have nearly tripled in the US in two weeks amid an onslaught of vaccine misinformation that is exhausting hospitals, doctors and pushing pastors into the fray .

Across the US, the seven-day rolling average for daily new cases rose over the past two weeks to more than 37,000 on Tuesday, down from 13,700 on July 6, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 56.2% of Americans have received at least one dose of the vaccine.

The president noted that the increase has become so severe that even his critics are pushing against vaccine disinfection.

Biden made an indirect reference to high-profile conservative personalities at Fox News who had “an altar call” and are now speaking openly to their skeptical guests about the benefits of vaccination. Sean Hannity recently told viewers, “I believe in the science of vaccination” and urged them to take the disease seriously. Steve Ducey, who co-hosts “Fox and Friends,” told viewers this week that the vaccination “will save your life.”

Before boarding Air Force One to return to Washington, Biden told reporters he was “glad he had the courage to say what he said.”

Asked about rising prices, Biden acknowledged there will be “near-term inflation” as the economy recovers from the pandemic, but said it is “highly unlikely that long-term inflation will get out of hand.”

Biden, who traveled to Ohio as he tried to raise support for his economic agenda, visited a union training center next to the town hall.

The visit comes as the fate of his infrastructure proposal remains unclear after Senate Republicans rejected a $1 trillion blueprint in a major test vote on Wednesday. A bipartisan group of 22 senators said in a joint statement after the vote that they were close to coming to an agreement and requested a delay until Monday.

Biden expressed confidence in the result, saying, “It’s a good thing and I think we’re going to get it.”

While lawmakers disputed the details of that proposal on Capitol Hill, Biden made the case that his nearly $4 trillion package was needed to rebuild the middle class and sustain economic growth in the country during the first six months of his presidency. Needed.

The president’s visit took him near the dangerously old Brent Spence Bridge—a chokepoint for trucks and emergency vehicles between Ohio and Kentucky that the previous two presidents had promised without success to replace.

Biden made a reference to the structure, telling town hall attendees that it was time to “fix that damn bridge of yours.”

When confronted with a question about the drug addiction crisis, she took note of it personally, noting that she was “very proud” of her son, Hunter Biden, who has lived up to his struggles with substance abuse. A memoir has been published about The president also noted that he feels a little self-conscious about some of the fringe benefits that come with the office. He laughed when he said he asked some White House staffers not to come over to serve breakfast. The real reason the President likes to have breakfast in his cloak.

Biden defends filibuster against repeated questions from CNN moderator Don Lemon about why he feels like it is a legislative tactic sometimes used to defend racist policies, some critics argue .

He said he is trying to bring the country closer together around the need to protect voting rights, and doesn’t want “the debate to be just about whether or not we have a filibuster.” Biden said that if Democrats removed the filibuster “you’re going to throw the whole Congress into chaos and nothing will happen.”

Back in Washington, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday dismissed two Republicans chosen by House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy to sit on the committee investigating the January 6 Capitol uprising. McCarthy said the GOP would not participate in the investigation if Democrats did not accept the members he had appointed.

Lemon asked how Biden can be confident that Republicans and Democrats can come together on anything, when they can’t even come…

Credit: www.independent.co.uk / Joe Biden

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