Black Alabama woman who survived KKK’s infamous bombing of church that killed four black girls demands state pay her compensation after previous governor ‘stoked racism’: Still needs regular treatment on eye she lost in blast 

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  • Sarah Collins Rudolph, 71, lost one eye in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church by the KKK and still has glass in her body.
  • Her sister and three other black teens were killed in the explosion that left her crippled
  • Then-government stern separatist George Wallace ignited racism with his rhetoric
  • Ive, the current government of Alabama, apologized to Rudolph for the blast, calling it a “gross injustice.”
  • He refused to pay restitution to Rudolph without legislative involvement.
  • He receives a $90 medical bill every few months to work on his prosthetic eye
  • Rudolph says he is owed millions of dollars for the pain and suffering he has endured because of the bombing

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‘Fifth Little Girl’ Sarah Collins Rudolph, who was permanently crippled in the 1963 KKK bombing of a Birmingham, Alabama church, says the state after former governor George Wallace fanned the fires of racism with his secession speeches should pay him lakhs.

Rudolph, 71, lost one eye in the Klan’s attack on Sixteenth Street Baptist Church 59 years ago and there are still pieces of glass inside his body.

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She was 10 years old when the attack happened and she is still waiting for the state to pay for those injuries.

Governor Kay Ivey sidestepped the question of financial compensation two years ago by apologizing to Rudolph for his ‘untold pain and suffering’, saying legislative participation was needed.

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But nothing has been done despite the efforts of lawyers representing Rudolph, leaving the question of payment unresolved even though victims of other attacks, including 9/11, were compensated.

Sarah Collins Rudolph, pictured here, survived the 1963 KKK bombing of Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. They believe that they owe crores to the state after the then government. George Wallace promoted racism with his separatist speeches

Most church-goers that day were able to evacuate the building as it filled with smoke, but the bodies of four young girls were found under rubble in a basement toilet.  Sarah Collins Rudolph (pictured), 10, who was in the restroom, lost her right eye

Most church-goers that day were able to evacuate the building as it filled with smoke, but the bodies of four young girls were found under rubble in a basement toilet. Sarah Collins Rudolph (pictured), 10, who was in the restroom, lost her right eye

Birmingham police and firefighters are seen here responding to the 1963 KKK attack on Sixteenth Street Baptist Church.  Sarah Collins Rudolph, who survived the blast, wants the state of Alabama to pay her millions as compensation for her injuries

Birmingham police and firefighters are seen here responding to the 1963 KKK attack on Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Sarah Collins Rudolph, who survived the blast, wants the state of Alabama to pay her millions as compensation for her injuries

The 1963 KKK church bombing in Birmingham killed 11-year-old Denise McNair and three 14-year-olds: Carol Robertson, Cynthia Morris, also known as Cynthia Wesley, and Rudolph's sister Eddie May Collins.

The 1963 KKK church bombing in Birmingham killed 11-year-old Denise McNair and three 14-year-olds: Carol Robertson, Cynthia Morris, also known as Cynthia Wesley, and Rudolph’s sister Eddie May Collins.

Rudolph, best known as the ‘Fifth Little Girl’ for surviving the infamous attack on the 16th Street Baptist Church, which was featured in Spike Lee’s 1997 documentary ‘4 Little Girls’, was ranked by state inaction. has been done.

Speaking in an interview with The Associated Press, Rudolph said Wallace helped lay the groundwork for the Klan attack with his separatist rhetoric, and that the state bears some responsibility for the bombing, which has not been prosecuted for years. was run.

“If they hadn’t stirred up all the racist hatred that was going on at the time, I wouldn’t have believed the church would have been bombed,” Rudolph said.

Denise (left), 11, was one of four girls killed in a bombing outside the church on September 15, 1963.  It also killed Eddie Collins (Sarah Collins Rudolph's sister, second from right), 14, Carol Robertson (second from second).  left), 14, and Cynthia Wesley (right), 14

Denise (left), 11, was one of four girls killed in a bombing outside the church on September 15, 1963. It also killed Eddie Collins (Sarah Collins Rudolph’s sister, second from right), 14, Carol Robertson (second from second). left), 14, and Cynthia Wesley (right), 14

Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr.

Bobby Frank Cherry

Robert Chambliss

Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr. (left) was the second of three men convicted in the bombing. Robert Chambliss (right) was convicted in 1977, and Bobby Frank Cherry (center) was convicted in 2002. All three had died in prison.

Rudolph attended a White House summit on combating hate-mongering violence Thursday on the anniversary of the bombing and was recognized by President Joe Biden.

Biden told Rudolph, ‘I went to church on this day in 2019, and I will go with you and always remember what happened.

Sarah Collins Rudolph believes the state of Alabama is to blame for her injuries after then-Governor George Wallace incited racism with his separatist rhetoric.

Sarah Collins Rudolph believes the state of Alabama is to blame for her injuries after then-Governor George Wallace incited racism with his separatist rhetoric.

In Birmingham, hundreds of people gathered for a memorial service at the church and laid wreaths at the site where the bomb was dropped.

Rudolph said she still incurs medical expenses from the explosion, including a $90 bill she receives every few months to work on a prosthesis she wears in place of her right eye, which was installed on September 15, 1963. was destroyed by shrapnel.

Anything would help, but Rudolph believes he owes millions.

Ishaan Bhabha, a lawyer representing Rudolph, said the state’s apology – carried out at Rudolph’s request with a plea for reinstatement – was only as a first step.

“He is entitled to justice in the form of compensation for the grievous injuries, and the cost, he has had to bear for almost 60 years,” he said. ‘We will continue to pursue any available avenues for Sarah to get the help she needs and deserves.’

Five girls were gathered in the downstairs bathroom at 16th Street Baptist Church when a bomb planted by KKK members exploded, leaving a large hole in the thick, brick wall.

The explosion killed 11-year-old Denise McNair and three 14-year-old children: Carol Robertson, Cynthia Morris, also known as Cynthia Wesley, and Rudolph’s sister Eddie May Collins.

Three members of the Klan, Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr., Frank Cherry and Robert Chambliss, who were convicted of murder in the bombing years, later died in prison. The fourth suspect died without charge.

The bombing came eight months after Wallace declared ‘forever segregation’ in his inaugural address and during the time when Birmingham schools were being first racially integrated.

The church itself has received government funding for the reconstruction, as has the adjoining Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument, erected by President Barack Obama in one of his last acts in office in 2017. ‘But not me,’ said Rudolph.

At the time of the apology, Ivey said in a letter to Rudolph’s attorney that any potential compensation would require legislative approval, Press Secretary Gina Maiola said.

“Furthermore, in the attorney-to-attorney conversation that soon began, the same point was reiterated,” she said.

No bill has been introduced to compensate Rudolph, legislative records show, and it is unclear whether such a law could pass anyway as conservative Republicans have an overwhelming majority and have tangled up in history lessons. Which can make white people feel bad about the past. ,

While the Alabama Crime Victims’ Compensation Commission helps victims and families with expenses associated with a crime, state law does not allow it to address crimes that occurred prior to the agency’s formation in 1984.

Rudolf has spent a lifetime dealing with physical and mental agony from the bombings.

Despite his injuries and stress disorders, Rudolph testified that helped in the sentencing of the men accused of planting the bombs, and he wrote a book about his life, entitled ‘The 5th Little Girl’.

Rudolph’s husband, George Rudolph, said he was disappointed and mad at the way his wife had been treated. Compensation was given to the victims of September 11, 2001, as were the victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, he said.

‘Why can’t they do anything for Sarah?’ They said.

Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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