Britain’s Covid cases fall for seventh day in-a-row: UK posts 30,597 infections in 22% drop on last week as hospital admissions dip by 10% but deaths rise slightly to 201 

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  • Health department data showed that another 836 people were admitted on September 11, which is 10 percent less.
  • 201 covid deaths recorded today, 10 deaths recorded from the same time last week
  • This comes as a MailOnline analysis today revealed that Covid cases are now falling in almost every age group.

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Britain’s COVID cases fell for the seventh day in a row, with official data showing a slight drop in hospitalizations today.

Health department officials recorded 30,597 more positive tests in the last 24 hours, more than a fifth of the same time last week. The decline was mostly driven by a drop in infections in England and Scotland, the government’s own data suggests.

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England still suffered a Scotland-style spike in cases following the return of millions of pupils to schools, despite dismal warnings that a major uptick was inevitable. Children have been back in classes for over a fortnight now.

The latest hospitalization figures showed another 836 people infected with the virus were admitted to NHS treatment on 11 September, a tenth from the previous Saturday.

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Meanwhile, another 201 Covid deaths were recorded today, which is 5 per cent more than the same period last week.

Both figures are weeks behind cases because of how long it can take for infected patients to become seriously ill.

Ministers have been keeping a close eye on two metrics since the roll-out of vaccines, which jabs significantly reduced disease risk.

Amid fears of a few months ahead in the fight against Covid, Boris Johnson unveiled a winter plan to avoid another lockdown at a Downing Street press conference yesterday, but said that thanks to vaccines the country is an ‘incomparably better’ was on the spot.

In the first phase, the country will roll out booster vaccines for those over age 50 and offer jabs for those over 12 to help keep a lid on the virus.

But if the NHS succumbs to ‘unstable’ pressure, the prime minister will opt for ‘Plan B’, which sees a return of face coverings in some settings, the re-introduction of WFH guidance, and a COVID passport imposed on nightclubs and large events can.

England: The graph above shows the number of COVID cases in England as of the date reported.  This shows that despite the reopening of schools, infections are decreasing in the country

England: The graph above shows the number of COVID cases in England as of the date reported. This shows that despite the reopening of schools, infections are decreasing in the country

Scotland: The graph above shows the number of COVID cases in Scotland as of the date reported.  This suggests that North Frontier cases are also falling after returning to school from summer, reaching their highest level since the pandemic began.

Scotland: The graph above shows the number of COVID cases in Scotland as of the date reported. This suggests that North Frontier cases are also falling after returning to school from summer, reaching their highest level since the pandemic began.

Wales: The graph above shows COVID cases as of the date reported in Wales.  This shows that despite the children returning to school, the country's infection also seems to be moving downwards.

Wales: The graph above shows COVID cases as of the date reported in Wales. This shows that despite the children returning to school, the country’s infection also seems to be moving downwards.

Northern Ireland: The graph above shows COVID cases as of the date reported in Northern Ireland.  It shows that despite the recent reopening of schools in the country, they are also on a downward trajectory.

Northern Ireland: The graph above shows COVID cases as of the date reported in Northern Ireland. It shows that despite the recent reopening of schools in the country, they are also on a downward trajectory.

The graph above shows rolling weekly COVID infection rates for age groups in England since 14 August.  This shows that cases are decreasing in every age group except 5 to 9-year-olds (fourth blue line from top on September 9) and 70- to 74-year-olds (sixth green line from bottom).  This suggests a decline in cases in 15 to 19-year-olds (light purple line second from top) and a slight decline in 10- to 14-year-olds (blue line at top).

The graph above shows rolling weekly COVID infection rates for age groups in England since 14 August. This shows that cases are decreasing in every age group except 5 to 9-year-olds (fourth blue line from top on September 9) and 70- to 74-year-olds (sixth green line from bottom). This suggests a decline in cases in 15 to 19-year-olds (light purple line second from top) and a slight decline in 10- to 14-year-olds (blue line at top).

The graph above shows the week-on-week percentage change in COVID infection rates for age groups in England since 21 August.  It suggests that cases fell most rapidly among adults in their early twenties (purple line) and children aged 15 to 19 (light purple line) on September 9 compared to the same time last week.  The data showed that it declined by 17 and 13 percent, respectively.

The graph above shows the week-on-week percentage change in COVID infection rates for age groups in England since 21 August. It suggests that cases fell most rapidly among adults in their early twenties (purple line) and children aged 15 to 19 (light purple line) on September 9 compared to the same time last week. The data showed that it declined by 17 and 13 percent, respectively.

England recorded a further 22,078 positive tests today, data from the Department of Health showed, a decrease of almost a quarter from last week and the biggest decline among Britain’s four countries.

In Scotland – which saw an increase in infections after schools returned from summer holidays – infections also declined, a 15 percent drop in a week after 4,917 were recorded.

And in Wales they fell 13.9 percent to 2,298. Northern Ireland was the only UK country to report an increase in cases today, when they rose 7.7 per cent to 1,304.

Currently only the 1.6 million oldest are eligible for booster jobs

With only 1.6 million Britons currently eligible for Covid booster vaccines, official figures show No10 is set to kick off the top-up drive next week.

Health chiefs yesterday unveiled plans to offer a third dose to more than 32 million 50s, frontline NHS workers and 16 more considered extremely vulnerable.

According to officials who signed the move due to weak immunity, people will be invited for boosters only six months after getting their second jab as it appears to be a ‘sweet spot’.

But Department of Health figures show that only 1.6 million people in the UK, mainly caring for domestic residents and frontline health workers, were fully vaccinated as of 15 March.

The UK did not breach the 30 million mark until June, meaning the campaign will not be open to millions of vulnerable adults until very close to Christmas.

Experts told MailOnline that the decision to delay the booster by six months should not be a cause for concern because the gap means people are given only a top-up dose as their immunity begins to wane.

But he warned that this could be a problem for a “small number” of older and vulnerable people whose immunity drops faster than expected.

A booster dose of the Pfizer jab, or half the dose of Moderna, will be given to eligible people starting next week, regardless of whether they initially received the jab.

For people who can’t get either of those two mRNA jabs, such as because of allergies, they will be given a single dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

The jabs will be distributed through vaccination centers, primary care networks and pharmacies and may be given at the same time as annual flu jabs.

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