But first, let me take a selfie! NASA’s Curiosity rover snaps a stunning 360-degree photo on the Red Planet

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  • NASA’s Curiosity rover takes a stunning 360-degree selfie of the Red Planet using its robotic arm
  • Veteran explorer took 81 individual photographs to create a panoramic view of its desolate surroundings
  • Sharing the pictures, Curiosity’s official Twitter account wrote: ‘Wait! selfie time’
  • The rover is headed for the ‘Maria Gordon Notch’, the U-shaped opening that can be seen behind it in the image

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NASA’s Curiosity rover took a 360-degree selfie of the Red Planet.

The veteran explorer, who launched to Mars 10 years ago, captured the image using a camera on the end of his robotic arm.

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It took 81 individual photographs to create a bird’s eye view of its desolate surroundings.

Sharing the pictures, the Curiosity rover’s Twitter account wrote: ‘Wait! selfie time. I took this 360-degree selfie using the Mars Hand Lens Imager on the end of my arm.’

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The landmark shown in the selfie includes a rock formation at the back of the rover known as the ‘Greenhue Pediment’, while a hill to the right is ‘Rafael Navarro Mountain’, named after a Curiosity team scientist , who died earlier this year.

NASA’s Curiosity rover captures a stunning 360-degree selfie of the Red Planet using a camera mounted on its robotic arm

Launched 10 years ago on Mars, the veteran explorer took 81 different photographs to create a bird's eye view of its desolate surroundings.

Launched 10 years ago on Mars, the veteran explorer took 81 different photos to create a bird’s eye view of its desolate surroundings.

How the Curiosity rover has improved our understanding of the Red Planet

The Mars Curiosity rover was initially launched on November 26, 2011 from Cape Canaveral, a US Air Force station in Florida.

After beginning a journey of 350 million miles (560 million km), the £1.8 billion ($2.5 billion) research vehicle touched down just 1.5 miles (2.4 km) away from the scheduled landing location.

After a successful landing on 6 August 2012, the rover has traveled approximately 11 miles (18 km).

It was launched aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft and the rover made up 23 percent of the total mission’s mass.

With 80 kg (180 lb) of scientific instruments on board, the rover weighs a total of 899 kg (1,982 lb) and is powered by a plutonium fuel source.

The rover is 2.9 m (9.5 ft) long by 2.7 m (8.9 ft) wide and 2.2 m (7.2 ft) high.

The rover was initially designed as a two-year mission to help answer whether the planet could support life, have liquid water, study the climate and geology of Mars.

Due to its success, the mission has been extended indefinitely and has now been active for over 3,000 days.

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The rover is currently headed for the ‘Maria Gordon Notch’, a U-shaped opening that can be built behind and to the left of it.

The Curiosity mission is led by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is managed by Caltech in Pasadena, California.

Last month the rover marked the 10th anniversary of its launch to Mars by sending back a spectacular ‘picture postcard’ from the Red Planet.

The robotic investigator took two black-and-white images of the Martian landscape, which were then combined and colored to produce remarkable blending.

Curiosity, which launched to the Red Planet nearly 10 years ago on November 26, 2011, took pictures From its most recent perch on the side of Mars’ Mount Sharp.

It captured a 360-degree view of its surroundings with its black-and-white navigation cameras, completing a drive each time the panorama was beamed back to Earth.

Curiosity isn’t the newest rover on Mars—that honor belongs to Perseverance, which arrived with NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter in February of this year and is Ancient microbial life discovered on the Red Planet.

Last month Persistence collected its third Mars sample, this time from a rock ‘filled with the green mineral olivine’.

The rover carries 43 titanium tubes, and as it finds a piece of rock of interest, it loads the sample into one of these tubes for later collection.

Billions of years ago, in the early days of the Solar System, the Jezero crater that is strongly scouting sheltered a lake and river delta, making it a good place to search for signs of ‘life’.

NASA is planning a mission to return about 30 samples to Earth in the 2030s, where scientists will be able to conduct more detailed analyzes that can confirm there was microbial life.

However, Persistence itself isn’t bringing the samples back to Earth—when the rover reaches a suitable location, the tubes will be dropped onto the surface of Mars to be collected by a future recovery mission, which is currently being developed. Used to be.

Curiosity (pictured as a model in California) was launched to the Red Planet on November 26, 2011, almost exactly 10 years ago

Curiosity (pictured as a model in California) was launched to the Red Planet on November 26, 2011, almost exactly 10 years ago

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