Can’t shift a headache? Listen to this song! Nurofen develops a music track that it claims can reduce PAIN 

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  • Researchers create new track to help people distract themselves from their pain
  • It also works by giving the brain a dose of the ‘happy chemical’ dopamine.
  • There was a significant improvement in pain levels in a study of 286 people.
  • They found that it works in headache, menstrual pain, back pain and muscle pain.

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A new song has been written that can reduce the intensity of a throbbing headache, helping you quell your agony, according to its developers.

According to its co-producer, Dr Claire Howlin from University College Dublin, it uses instrumental, orchestral and vocal elements to create a sense of ‘wonder’.

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The team reported that it was tested across the US on 286 people with active acute pain, including headache, back pain and general muscle pain.

Working with musician Anatole, they wanted to create something that would ‘help people feel empowered so that they can separate from their pain.’

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Funded by Nurofen, the trial found we all helped reduce pain intensity and feelings of unpleasantness in a way that was clinically and statistically significant.

It works through both by distracting from pain and by persuading the brain to release a dose of the happy chemical, dopamine.

A new song has been written that can reduce the intensity of a throbbing headache, helping you quell your agony, according to its developers. stock image

relieve pain with music

A survey of 2,000 people found that 15 percent identified music as a way to better tolerate acute pain.

However, 80 per cent said they would do so if music proved to be helpful.

Other key findings:

  • Classic (32%), pop (31%) and rock (22%) were the top genres people would listen to in pain
  • Women were more likely than men to listen to pop (37% vs. 24%), R&B (21% vs. 14%) and hip hop (13% vs. 9%)
  • Men were more likely than women to choose classical (35% vs. 29%), rock (28% vs. 16%) and metal (10% vs. 6%)
  • In England, there was a clear north-south divide in musical tastes to manage pain.
  • Respondents from Greater London, the South East and the South West were more likely to listen to classical
  • Pop was the first choice of people in the North East and North West as well as Yorkshire
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The new track is part of the Nurofen Tune Out Pain Project that brings together experts from the worlds of science, pain management and music.

Anatole, is a conservatory-trained trumpeter and multi-instrumentalist, and was brought on board to compose the track based on Dr. Howlin’s research.

During the trial, participants with different types of acute pain such as headache, back pain or menstrual pain reported a reduction in their level of pain intensity when listening to the track.

Dr. Howlin’s research into music and pain allowed him to direct him to incorporate some of the elements needed to help Anatole appropriately distract from suffering.

This involved making the track as engaging, interesting and enjoyable as possible so that people would not focus on their pain.

This was achieved by applying instrumental and orchestral sounds such as strings, piano, bells, and minor vocal samples to induce wonder, empowerment, and mental strength to help one detach from pain.

Anatole commented, ‘As a music producer, creating science-driven music was an exciting challenge for me.

‘All of Us is special because every note, beat and sound is designed to make a special impression on the listener based on the insights provided by Dr. Howlin.

‘Music and pain is something we all experience – this project shows just how powerful music is and the potential benefits it has for our well-being.’

Dr. Howlin said music has the ability to give people a huge burst of dopamine in their neural reward networks.

“This track reduced both the intensity and unpleasantness of pain and underscores the ability to actually create specific pieces of music for pain management, achieving an effect of this size for a completely unfamiliar track, ” she explained.

The full results of the Tune Out Pain study will be submitted to an academic journal for publication.

The research aims to help with the scientific understanding of how holistic pain management techniques, such as listening to music, can help people with acute pain.

The team reported that it was tested across the US on 286 people with active acute pain, including headache, back pain and general muscle pain.  stock image

The team reported that it was tested across the US on 286 people with active acute pain, including headache, back pain and general muscle pain. stock image

What is Dopamine?

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that is known to play a role in how our brains get pleasure from activities such as gambling and sex, as well as addiction.

These gratifying activities and drugs increase dopamine levels in the brain.

When we have too little dopamine, we feel bored, unmotivated or depressed.

Dopamine is produced in many parts of the brain, including the hypothalamus.

Its effect on the brain depends on a few different factors, such as the types of neurons combined with it.

Scientists originally thought this substance was related to true happiness.

New research shows that dopamine is more related to anticipated pleasure and motivation.

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Additional research from Nurofen shows that only 15 percent of people identified music as a good way to better tolerate acute pain.

This was when compared to other complimentary methods such as regular exercise, a good night’s sleep or breathing techniques.

However, 69 percent of respondents said they are interested in more holistic pain relief methods to use alongside over-the-counter medication.

The survey of 2,000 people found that 71 percent also believe that music has a positive effect on their general well-being and 74 percent believe it has the ability to make them feel different emotions.

Other findings include the fact that classical and pop were the genres people were most likely to listen to if they were in pain, coming in at 32 and 31 percent.

Women were more…

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