Children may get ‘better’ immunity from catching Covid naturally instead of getting single vaccine, scientists say amid row over UK’s decision to jab youngsters

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  • Professor David Livermore says vaccinating 12 to 15-year-olds against Kovid is ‘extremely pointless’
  • He told MailOnline that he would get better immunity from a natural infection rather than a single dose of the vaccine.
  • COVID vaccines work by teaching the immune system to recognize and fight the virus

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Children may get ‘better’ immunity from catching Covid naturally rather than taking a single dose of the vaccine, a scientist said today, amid controversy over Britain’s decision to forcibly expel 12-year-olds .

Professor David Livermore, a microbiologist at the University of East Anglia, claimed it was “grossly pointless” to vaccinate young people, who face such a low risk of becoming seriously ill with COVID.

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He told MailOnline that they will likely develop more protection from catching the virus, in the same way that they build up immunity against other seasonal diseases.

Kovid vaccines teach the immune system to recognize the virus and give it the power to fight it in the future.

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But some studies have suggested that vaccine-triggered immunity begins to decline within six months, while some data has suggested that people who have recovered from the virus may be protected for at least a year.

An Israeli study claims that people who get the vaccine are 13 times more likely to catch COVID than those who have recovered from a previous infection.

Professor Chris Whitty and other chief medical officials in Britain said yesterday that children aged 12 to 15 should be offered a single dose of the Pfizer vaccine. Children who are deemed ‘competent’ will be able to overturn their parents’ desire to vaccinate, if they choose to do so.

But fury raged last night as experts and parents warned that the decision could threaten illiterate children and even ‘break up families’.

Vaccines Minister Nadim Zahavi has said that families should be supported in whatever decision they make, and that no one should be stigmatized for opposing vaccination.

This comes after the JCVI recommended today that people over 50 should get their third dose of the COVID vaccine six months after their second shot.

Scientists are divided on whether 12 to 15-year-olds should get the Kovid vaccine, with some SAGE members first supporting the move, arguing that it would help stem the rise in infections later this winter .

But others have argued that it would be ethically questionable to vaccinate the age group when millions of people in poor countries are still waiting to be vaccinated.

Professor Chris Whitty and other chief medical officers recommend the introduction of the Kovid vaccine for children aged 12 to 15 years

Professor David Livermore said vaccinating children is ‘extremely pointless’. Professor Chris Whitty and other chief medical officers recommend the introduction of the Kovid vaccine for children aged 12 to 15 years

This graph shows the number of first doses by age group.  The NHS publishes age groups as five-year terms, and groups all people under the age of 18 together.  It shows that more than 620,000 have already been vaccinated among under-18s

This graph shows the number of first doses by age group. The NHS publishes age groups as five-year terms, and groups all people under the age of 18 together. It shows that more than 620,000 have already been vaccinated among under-18s

Israel has seen its Covid hospitalizations increase since starting to administer booster shots (shown in the graph above of weekly hospitalizations with the virus per million people)

Israel has seen its Covid hospitalizations increase after starting to administer booster shots (shown in the graph above of weekly hospitalizations with the virus per million people)

Independent SAGE member says over-fives could be next group to offer COVID vaccine

An independent SAGE member has said that over-fives may be next for a COVID vaccine.

Professor Devi Sridhar, a global public health expert at the University of Edinburgh, told Good Morning Britain that there was ‘the next issue on the horizon’ for this age group.

She added: ‘Not to mention the exciting thing on the horizon, even for parents of young children,

‘It looks like Pfizer is going to approve a vaccine for five- to 11-year-olds in the United States in October, so that’s going to be the next issue on the horizon – once we get to 12-17-year-olds. Let’s deal with what we do for under-12s.

Yesterday Professor Chris Whitty and chief medical officials of developed countries recommended vaccines for 12 to 15-year-olds saying they would take time off school because of the virus.

But he said there were “no plans” to expand the roll out to children in the younger age group.

Professor Whitty said at a Downing Street press conference: ‘We certainly have no plans to re-examine at this time, there are some countries that are doing so.

‘It has not even reached the point where the MHRA has considered it, so we are a long way off to think about it, so let’s not rush on that at all.’

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Discussing the decision to sign off Jabs for all 12 overs, Professor Livermore told MailOnline: ‘I think what has been done is really pointless. This is a misuse of the vaccine.

‘Children are at very low risk of serious infection, and we are really better off building up a better immunity to this virus. [through infection] As we do with scores of other circulating viruses.’

He added: ‘Vaccination to protect children from serious infections has not been justified, but schools can be kept open. It is based on a false premise. The schools here should not have been closed at all.

Professor Livermore, who is also a member of the anti-lockdown health advisor and recovery team (HART), pointed to Sweden, which kept its schools open during the first wave despite no vaccine available at the time.

And last winter it managed to keep schools open for 16 to 19-year-olds except for higher secondary schools, which were closed from December to April.

Several studies from Israel – which is famous for one of the world’s leading inoculation drives – have already suggested that vaccine-triggered immunity decreases within six months after the second dose is administered.

The country’s official data shows that Covid hospitalizations began in August, nearly six months after their vaccination program forcibly shut down older adults in the country.

But admissions began to drop again just two weeks after the boosters were introduced – which is roughly how long it takes for a vaccine to…

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