Children should be taught to treat their own illnesses instead of going to the GP to curb pressures on family doctors, NHS leaders say

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  • Proposal says kids should be taught if they really need to see a GP if they’re sick
  • They will also be taught to take care of themselves for problems such as head injuries. Vomit
  • NHS leaders claim proposal will help free up GP’s time for other matters

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NHS officials say children should be taught how to treat illnesses themselves in an effort to reduce GP workloads.

Family doctors have complained about unnecessary paperwork and admin as well as patient visits, which can be dealt with at home or by a pharmacist.

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Now health chiefs have issued a series of nine recommendations that they say could prevent unnecessary GP and A&E visits.

One includes the ‘Dr Me’ programme, in which children are given an hour-long lesson by medical students on self-care techniques and ‘appropriate use of NHS services’ for problems such as vomiting and diarrhea.

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Under this scheme, youth are given six health-related scenarios and then asked whether they should stay at home, visit a GP or attend A&E.

The authors of the report, which includes the NHS Clinical Commission, the Royal College of Nursing and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, say this will help free up health professionals’ time.

This face-to-face comes amid an ongoing dispute between the government and gram panchayats over the lack of appointments.

Some doctors are actively going against Health Secretary Sajid Javid’s orders to see more patients in person, with hundreds of GPs asking to ‘ignore’ the guidelines.

Proposals suggested by NHS leaders will teach children under the age of 5 how to ‘self-care’ for various conditions such as head injuries and vomiting and whether or not they really need to see a GP

Last week the health secretary announced plans to empower patients to demand a face-to-face appointment with their family doctor

Last week the health secretary announced plans to empower patients to demand a face-to-face appointment with their family doctor

Yesterday, practices serving millions of patients in the south of England were advised not to ‘participate’ in government plans to improve access to GPs.

Last week Mr Javid announced a nine-point plan to ensure that all patients can see their doctor in person, including the right for patients to demand a face-to-face appointment.

Patient groups supported the move, saying doctors had ignored patients’ wishes for too long in this case.

The Granthshala is campaigning for the return of face-to-face appointments by default. Before the pandemic, 80 per cent consultations were in-person, but now it has come down to only 57 per cent.

The number of face-to-face GP appointments declined at the start of the pandemic when surgeries were asked to remotely see patients where possible.  But despite normalcy at large in the country, in-person visits have yet to climb to pre-pandemic levels.  The above graph shows the number of face-to-face GP appointments (red line) from the end of 2019 to the month

The number of face-to-face GP appointments declined at the start of the pandemic when surgeries were asked to remotely see patients where possible. But despite normalcy at large in the country, in-person visits have yet to climb to pre-pandemic levels. The above graph shows the number of face-to-face GP appointments (red line) from the end of 2019 to the month

Over the past decade, the average number of sessions GPs work a day has decreased while their pay increases have increased.  In 2012 the average GP worked 7.3 sessions a week, but this has now fallen to 6.6 per week, which is equivalent to three days of work a week.  Average GP income increased by over £6,000 over the same period.  A GP's daily work is divided into sessions.  According to the NHS, a full-time GP works 8 sessions a week, composed of two sessions a day, typically starting at 8am and ending at 6.30pm, although these hours can vary .

Over the past decade, the average number of sessions GPs work a day has decreased while their pay increases have increased. In 2012 the average GP worked 7.3 sessions a week, but this has now fallen to 6.6 per week, which is equivalent to three days of work a week. Average GP income increased by over £6,000 over the same period. A GP’s daily work is divided into sessions. According to the NHS, a full-time GP works 8 sessions a week, composed of two sessions a day, typically starting at 8am and ending at 6.30pm, although these hours can vary .

NHS digital data shows in Bury, Greater Manchester, patients saw just a third (36 per cent) of the doctor in July.  Patients in North East Lincolnshire and Lincolnshire were placed through another staff member two-thirds of the time.  Doctors in North East Essex, Portsmouth, Kirklees, Bradford and Craven in North Yorkshire saw patients in less than 40 percent of their appointments.

NHS digital data shows in Bury, Greater Manchester, patients saw just a third (36 per cent) of the doctor in July. Patients in North East Lincolnshire and Lincolnshire were placed through another staff member two-thirds of the time. Doctors in North East Essex, Portsmouth, Kirklees, Bradford and Craven in North Yorkshire saw patients in less than 40 percent of their appointments.

A total of 52 percent of consultations in July were with an actual doctor, with the rest by other healthcare workers, such as nurses, pharmacy assistants and even acupuncturists.

A total of 52 percent of consultations in July were with an actual doctor, with the rest by other healthcare workers, such as nurses, pharmacy assistants and even acupuncturists.

Last week the government unveiled a nine-point plan to ensure that all patients can see a doctor face-to-face in a big win for our campaign.

Amid growing queues over lack of in-person appointments Official NHS data shows that just half of GP appointments in England are with a qualified doctor.

Defending the figures, the Royal College of GPs claimed that the family doctor was not always the most appropriate person to see patients. But campaigners said they fear patients are being diverted to take some of the pressure off GPs’ workloads.

NHS leaders’ report on improving self-care in the country says the Department for Education’s guidance for children on physical and mental health provides a ‘good starting point’ but does not prioritize ‘appropriate use of NHS services’ Is.

Published by consumer healthcare organization PAGB, the recommendation for children was part of a suite of options called by the NHS Coalition as part of creating a ‘national self-care strategy’ for England.

The overall objective is to improve people’s ability to care for themselves and reduce the demand for health services.

Other recommendations in the report include expanding the role of pharmacists to refer patients directly to other health professionals and using digital technology to its ‘full potential’.

To achieve this, ‘rigorous patient routes, unnecessary prescribing habits and firm perceptions of hierarchy in the NHS must be overcome,’ the report said.

And one of the benefits of reducing unnecessary pressure will be ensuring that health professionals have more time for those who need it most, claims the report.

“It has a significant role to play in reducing unnecessary GP appointments and A&E attendance for minor ailments, devoting health professionals’ time to those who are most in need of their help,” it added. it reads.

Fury as NHS practices told to ignore calls for the right to see a…

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