Clinical tests for women after a FIRST miscarriage: NHS trusts are urged to ditch ‘rule of three’ to prevent patients from losing more babies

- Advertisement -


  • Women suffering miscarriage will be offered first aid under the proposed new guidelines
  • Updated rules mean women can get support after first miscarriage
  • Many women struggle to find an underlying cause for the loss of the baby and are asked to try again.

- Advertisement -

Women who miscarry will be offered help under new guidelines proposed earlier to prevent them from losing more babies.

They are currently eligible for testing and screening on the NHS only if they have had three consecutive miscarriages.

advertisement

Charities say this ‘rule of three’ has resulted in thousands of women and their partners suffering devastating and preventable harm.

Updated guidelines released last night by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists will mean women can get support after a first miscarriage.

- Advertisement -

The Royal College wants all NHS trusts to adopt policy and revolutionize the care of women who have suffered from a ‘painful, shocking and traumatic experience’.

Around 1 per cent of couples lose three or more babies to a miscarriage, which is defined by the NHS as the loss of a pregnancy before 24 weeks. One in every four pregnancies ends in miscarriage, with an estimated cost to the economy of £471 million a year in health care and lost productivity.

Many women struggle to find out if there is an underlying cause and are simply told to try again.

The new guidelines say that information should be given after the first abortion to increase the chances of future success.

Women suffering miscarriages will be offered first aid under proposed new guidelines to prevent them from losing more babies

Second time afflicted women will be offered an appointment at a specialist clinic to identify the cause and provide more support in future pregnancies.

After three they will be eligible for major screening and care, such as blood tests to detect any genetic abnormalities.

The guidelines, which redefine ‘recurrent miscarriage’ to include non-frequent events, are to be finalized by the end of the year. Last night the charity called for a ‘commitment from the NHS’ to implement them.

The document also summarized new evidence on possible causes of miscarriage. This highlights for the first time that men’s age is a risk factor for recurrent miscarriage. Other factors include being black or Asian, being underweight or overweight, smoking and consuming more caffeine.

Dr Edward Morris, President of the Royal College (pictured), said: 'Miscarriage is a harrowing, shocking and painful experience for many women and their partners.  We believe that women should access appropriate and standardized care after their first abortion and this is why we are supporting the hierarchical model for abortion care.

Dr Edward Morris, President of the Royal College (pictured), said: ‘Miscarriage is a harrowing, shocking and painful experience for many women and their partners. We believe that women should access appropriate and standardized care after their first abortion and this is why we are supporting the hierarchical model for abortion care.

Dr Edward Morris, President of the Royal College, said: ‘Miscarriage is a harrowing, shocking and painful experience for many women and their partners.

‘We believe that women should have access to appropriate and standardized care after their first abortion and this is why we are supporting the hierarchical model for abortion care.’

Jane Brevin, head of baby loss charity Tommy, welcomed the Royal College’s move, which she said was in line with recommendations made by their organisation, which were supported by research published in the medical journal The Lancet.

She added: ‘We know what to do and how to do it, so now we need a commitment in the NHS to develop these care pathways and improve support for all.’

We HRT our staff. will pay for

High street chain Timpson announced yesterday that it will cover the cost of hormone replacement therapy for workers going through menopause.

James Timpson, the chief executive officer of the shoe repair and locksmith company, was praised as he revealed the move on World Menopause Day.

HRT prescriptions are free in Scotland and Wales, but patients in England must pay £9.34 per month for replacement hormones.

The MPs are running a campaign to remove this wrongdoing. Mr Timpson said yesterday: ‘Starting today, all of my colleagues can claim an expense on their prescription costs when HRT is recommended.

‘It is so important that we support our partners going through menopause.’

Labor MP Caroline Harris, who is due to introduce a bill on October 29 to end charges for HRT, said: ‘It is a testament to what a wonderful employer they are and how strongly they are concerned with the welfare of their employees. care about.’

advertisement

.

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories