Copper ‘slave badge’ used to identify enslaved people in Charleston who were hired out to temporary owners in 1835, Egypt’s Golden City and oldest human footprints in North America are among world’s top ten archaeological discoveries for 2021 

- Advertisement -


  • Archeology magazine releases top 10 finds for 2021, including tiny slave badges
  • The tag is engraved with the year ‘1853’ and was discovered in March in Charleston, South Carolina
  • This allowed slaves to work away from their owners and within the city limits of Charleston.
  • The badge made the list of Archaeological Magazine because Charleston was the only US location that provided a working permit, making the artifact a very rare find.
  • It also includes the 3,500-year-old Golden City of Egypt and footprints found in New Mexico, which were first created by humans across the Americas 23,000 years ago.
  • The world’s oldest artwork found in Tibet and the oldest leather tools discovered in Morocco also make the list, along with the oldest animal artwork and the oldest maps ever found in Europe.
  • The journal also highlighted the study that found Vikings came to New Verk 400 years before Christopher Columbus, and lists the mass graves of 25 crusaders found in Lebanon.

- Advertisement -

A small slave badge engraved with the year ‘1853’ that was discovered earlier this year in Charleston, South Carolina is one of those archeology journalTop 10 searches in 2021.

The square, copper item acts as a permit, allowing servants to work in the city and away from their master, who pays anywhere from $10 to $35 for the tag.

advertisement

The badge made the list of Archaeological Magazine because Charleston was the only US place where a working permit was granted, making the artifact a very rare find.

The list also includes the discovery of the 3,500-year-old Golden City in Egypt, considered the most important discovery since King Tutankhamun, and footprints found in New Mexico, the first humans to trek across the Americas 23,000 years ago. Had gone.

- Advertisement -

scroll down for video

A small slave badge engraved with the year ‘1853’ discovered in Charleston, South Carolina earlier this year is one of Archaeological Magazine’s Top 10 Discoveries in 2021. The square, the copper object, served as the permit, allowing the servant to work. In town and away from the owner who paid anywhere from $10 to $35 for the tag

The journal Archeology has been published by the Archaeological Institute of America for more than 70 years and the top 10 list will appear in the January/February 2022 issue of the magazine, set to hit newsstands this week.

Marley Brown, associate editor of Archeology magazine, said in a statement: ‘We felt the tag should be included because it was reminiscent of a man who might have otherwise been lost to time and the dehumanizing system of slavery.

‘What’s more, the fact that the College of Charleston team retrieved the object from its archaeological context provides a great opportunity to learn more about the person who once wore it – considering many of these tags A real gift to doer is not a perfect one.’

The tag was found at Charleston College, which states that the servant lost his permit while working for the construction in 1785.

This year has made many astonishing discoveries, with Egypt's Golden City highlighted by Archaeology magazine's list as the largest ancient city in Luxor.  Announced on 8 April, excavations found bakeries, workshops and burials of animals and humans, along with jewelry, pottery and clay bricks bearing the seals of Amenhotep III.  The city is located between the temple of Ramesses III in Medinet Habu and the temple of Amenhotep III in Memon.

This year has made many astonishing discoveries, with Egypt’s Golden City highlighted by Archaeology magazine’s list as the largest ancient city in Luxor. Announced on 8 April, excavations found bakeries, workshops and burials of animals and humans, along with jewelry, pottery and clay bricks bearing the seals of Amenhotep III. The city is located between the temple of Ramesses III in Medinet Habu and the temple of Amenhotep III in Memon.

The team initially searched the shrine of Tutankhamun's morgue, where the young king was mummified and received status rites, but they stumble upon something much bigger than this.  The picture is an amulet found at the site and was placed on a burial site within the limits of the ancient city.

The team initially searched the shrine of Tutankhamun’s morgue, where the young king was mummified and received status rites, but they stumble upon something much bigger than this. The picture is an amulet found at the site and was placed on a burial site within the limits of the ancient city.

It is the oldest higher education institution in the south of Virginia and the 13th oldest in the US.

Slave tags began in the 18th century and were in use until 1865.

They were usually stamped with a date, occupation (fisher, servant, porter, etc.) and registration number.

This was used as evidence that the owner of the enslaved person had sanctioned this person to work for someone else and outside the owner’s location.

The tag was discovered at an excavation site at 63½ Cumming St., where a solar pavilion was to be built.

Since the school had received federal dollars from the US Department of Energy through the South Carolina Department of Energy to complete the project, an investigation had to be completed in the area.

Excavations began in February, and in March, the Das Badge came to the fore and was officially announced in June.

Another top find are ancient human footprints found in New Mexico in September.  The 23,000-year-old prints were discovered by British and American archaeologists at Alkali Flats, a dry lake in White Sands National Park.  Researchers say the prints — which are flat, a possible sign that people were barefoot — reveal more than just a date.  They offer a glimpse into what life was like during the Upper Paleolithic, which began about 40,000 years ago.

Another top find are ancient human footprints found in New Mexico in September. NS…

,

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories