Covid cases are now falling in almost EVERY age group in England – and are dropping quickest among teenagers and young adults, official data shows

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  • Health department data showed that only 5 to 9 year olds and 75 to 79 year olds have increased infection yesterday.
  • Cases are now falling sharply among children aged 15 to 19 and adults in their early 20s compared to the same time last week
  • A week after the reopening of schools in England, recession was recorded, which there were fears it would spike
  • Experts said that today some studies have shown that reopening schools actually reduces the transmission of covid

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Official data has shown that Covid cases are now falling in almost every age group in England, with teens and young adults falling most rapidly.

The health department last weekend calculated the infection rate for every age group except for five to nine-year-olds and 75 to 79-year-olds.

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The slowdown was recorded despite the reopening of schools, which some scientists feared would lead to an escalation of the Scotland-style coronavirus pandemic. But it has not materialized yet and daily affairs are going in the opposite direction since lakhs of students went back to classes.

Cases fell most rapidly among adults in their early twenties and children aged 15 to 19, falling by 17 percent and 13 percent, respectively, in one week. There was also a slight drop in cases among 10 to 14-year-olds.

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Experts said today’s figures could provide evidence that the virus has become endemic, with Britain no longer in a critical position where cases could explode at any time. Instead, covids will come in waves as immunity gradually fades.

Vaccines and natural immunity have helped reduce the risk of the virus to a great extent, effectively turning it into a severe cold for most people who become infected. But because protection wanes over time, it will continue to spread through generations, just like other coronaviruses.

It comes after Britain reported a week-on-week decline in cases for the sixth consecutive day yesterday, largely driven by shrinking outbreaks in England and Scotland. Health department officials reported 26,628 cases, which is almost 30 per cent less than the same period last week.

Amid fears of a few months ahead in the fight against Covid, Boris Johnson unveiled a winter plan to avoid another lockdown at a Downing Street press conference yesterday, but said that thanks to vaccines the country is an ‘incomparably better’ was on the spot.

In the first phase, the country will roll out booster vaccines for those over age 50 and offer jabs for those over 12 to help keep a lid on the virus.

But if the NHS succumbs to ‘unstable’ pressure, the prime minister will opt for ‘Plan B’, which sees a return of face coverings in some settings, the re-introduction of WFH guidance, and a COVID passport imposed on nightclubs and large events can.

Experts told the PM that he should be prepared to ‘go hard, go fast’ if cases start coming up, giving at least a week’s notice to bring back rules like work from home.

The graph above shows rolling weekly COVID infection rates for age groups in England since 14 August. This shows that cases are decreasing in every age group except 5 to 9-year-olds (fourth blue line from top on September 9) and 70- to 74-year-olds (sixth green line from bottom). This suggests a decline in cases among 15 to 19-year-olds (light purple line second from top) and a slight decline (blue line at top) among 10 to 14-year-olds.

The graph above shows the week-on-week percentage change in COVID infection rates for age groups in England since 21 August.  It suggests that cases fell most rapidly among adults in their early twenties (purple line) and children aged 15 to 19 (light purple line) on September 9 compared to the same time last week.  The data showed that it declined by 17 and 13 percent, respectively.

The graph above shows the week-on-week percentage change in COVID infection rates for age groups in England since 21 August. It suggests that cases fell most rapidly among adults in their early twenties (purple line) and children aged 15 to 19 (light purple line) on September 9 compared to the same time last week. The data showed that it declined by 17 and 13 percent, respectively.

England: The graph above shows the number of lateral flow tests performed in a day in England (blue bar) and the average number for the past seven days (blue line).  indicating that the tests performed increased when they returned to school

England: The graph above shows the number of lateral flow tests performed in a day in England (blue bar) and the average number for the past seven days (blue line). indicating that the tests performed increased when they returned to school

England: The graph above shows the number of PCR tests performed in England in a day (grey bars) and their positivity rate – or the percentage of swabs that detected the virus (blue line).  PCR tests have increased slightly since the return of schools

England: The graph above shows the number of PCR tests performed in England in a day (grey bars) and their positivity rate – or the percentage of swabs that detected the virus (blue line). PCR tests have increased slightly since the return of schools

England: The graph above shows the number of COVID cases in England as of the date reported.  It suggests the country has yet to see a spike in recorded infections in Scotland after children return to school

England: The graph above shows the number of COVID cases in England as of the date reported. It suggests the country has yet to see a spike in recorded infections in Scotland after children return to school

Scotland: Pictured above are the COVID cases in Scotland as of the date reported.  The blue line shows the average cases which are now falling sharply

Scotland: Pictured above are the COVID cases in Scotland as of the date reported. The blue line shows the average cases which are now falling sharply

Health department data from the COVID Dashboard suggests that the infection rate among 15 to 19-year-olds could be at its highest level at 845.4 positive tests per 100,000 in the week ending September 6.

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