Covid deaths fell by a fifth in England in October but there are early signs they may be creeping up again this month, ONS data shows

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  • ONS figures show Covid deaths fell from 64.4 per 100,000 in September to 50.8 per 100,000 in October
  • Government statistical body said coronavirus death toll declined for the first time since May
  • But a separate release shows that Covid deaths hit an eight-month high in the week ending November 12.

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The proportion of deaths due to Covid in England fell by a fifth last month, official figures showed today, although a separate release shows fatalities are now beginning to trend upward.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that the death toll with Covid as mentioned on death certificates fell from 64.4 per 100,000 in September to 50.8 per 100,000 in October. For the first time since May, the monthly Kovid death rate has declined.

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The coronavirus has accounted for one in 20 (5.6 percent) of all fatalities during the past month, the third leading cause of death after dementia (101.7 deaths per 100,00) and heart disease (90.1 per 100,000). .

But a separate release from the ONS showed that deaths from the virus have again started an upward trend this month.

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The number of deaths in England rose to 943 in the week ending 12 November, up from 892 in the previous seven days – an increase of 5.7 per cent – while they rose from 75 to 98 in Wales (30 per cent).

In both England and Wales, 1,020 deaths mentioned Covid on death certificates during the week ending 12 November – the first time since the week ended 14 March that coronavirus fatalities breached the 1,000 mark.

The number of deaths usually peaks for about two weeks in cases, but when the infection came back after children returned to classes, deaths have begun partly due to a successor to the booster vaccine rollout this month.

Experts have warned that infections will fluctuate throughout the winter, but hospitalizations and deaths should not increase due to the rollout of the vaccine and the high levels of natural immunity, which can lead to COVID catching and becoming seriously unwell. The link between them becomes weak.

Education Secretary Mr Jahvi predicted yesterday that the UK would be the first country in the world to beat the pandemic, as the virus was allowed to spread over the summer when COVID restrictions were lifted.

Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) shows that the proportion of Covid deaths in England fell by a fifth last month. The graph shows: Age-adjusted rate of Covid deaths per 100,000 in England

But a separate release from the ONS showed that the death toll has started again this month, reaching an eight-month high in the week ended November 12.

But a separate release from the ONS showed that the death toll has started again this month, reaching an eight-month high in the week ended November 12.

In October, Covid was the third biggest killer in England, with dementia and Alzheimer's causing the most deaths and heart disease the second highest.

In October, Covid was the third biggest killer in England, with dementia and Alzheimer’s causing the most deaths and heart disease the second highest.

The Covid death rate in England was creeping up last month before a drop in deaths due to the virus from May.

Deaths from all causes also declined from 44,474 in September to 43,435 in October – with 912 deaths per 100,000 people the previous month.

UK daily Covid cases rise 13% in one week to 44,917, but deaths drop slightly with 45 victims

The UK’s daily Covid cases rose by a tenth in a week, but deaths fell for the fourth day in a row, as former Vaccines Minister Nadim Zahvi claims the UK will be the first country to overcome the virus.

According to the government’s Covid dashboard, another 44,917 infections were recorded yesterday, an increase of 13.1 per cent over the 39,705 cases reported on Monday.

Cases have been on an upward trajectory for the past fortnight after schools went back to school from a half-holiday break at the beginning of the month.

The deaths have fallen to their lowest level since the start of the month. However, the figures released on Mondays are always lower than the weekly average due to delays in reporting over the weekend. Meanwhile, week-on-week hospitalizations fell by 10 percent.

Both measurements are two to three weeks behind the trend in cases as a person delays catching COVID and becomes seriously unwell.

In an early sign of a booster effect, infections are already falling into the 80s, fueling hopes that those being given to youth – fueling the latest increase – will similarly decrease case numbers. Will come

Experts have warned that infections will fluctuate throughout the winter, but hospitalizations and deaths should not increase due to vaccine rollouts and high levels of natural immunity, leading to a risk of catching COVID and becoming seriously unwell. The middle link becomes weak.

It comes as Education Secretary Mr Jahvi predicted yesterday that the UK would be the first country in the world to defeat the pandemic, as the virus was allowed to spread over the summer when Covid restrictions were lifted.

And experts insist Britain will avoid a wave of cases wreaking havoc across Europe and sending nations back into lockdown as it moves forward with ‘Independence Day’.

Britain was slammed as the ‘sick man of Europe’ in the summer and autumn for consistently recording the highest level of infections on the continent.

But Austria yesterday became the first country in Western Europe to impose a nationwide lockdown and the Czech Republic and Slovakia put the unaffiliated under stay-at-home orders. Germany is also considering making the vaccine mandatory.

And over the weekend there were also violent protests in the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and Northern Ireland protesting the restrictions.

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Covid deaths across England fell by 2,955 to 2,411.

Among men, the death rate fell from 85 per 100,000 in September to 67 per 100,000 in October – a 20 percent drop.

A 16 percent drop in similar women declined from 48 per 100,000 to 38.3 per 100,000.

The ONS said: ‘Taking into account the size and age structure of the population, the age-standardised mortality rate (ASMR) for Covid deaths in England has decreased significantly to 50.8 deaths per 100,000 people as of May 2021. After the first shortcoming.

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