Cryptocurrency website Bitcoin.org is hacked and pop-up message asks visitors to send money to ‘earn double back’

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  • The ‘open-source’ website Bitcoin.org seems to have been hacked, with a pop-up message appearing on the site offering a ‘giveaway’.
  • Ad asked visitors to send money to an address with a promise to ‘double it’
  • The digital wallet address on the ad collected $17,700 in small transactions before the site went offline
  • The so-called ‘giveaway gang’ made $18 million in the first three months of this year
  • Last year, the original Twitter accounts of prominent figures like Bill Gates, Elon Musk and Kim Kardashian were hacked to promote similar scams.

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Major cryptocurrency website Bitcoin.org was hacked on Wednesday night, with attackers posting a pop-up message promising that visitors could ‘double’ any money sent to them.

The scam message listed a digital wallet address that collected $17,700 in small transactions before the entire website went offline in the early hours of Thursday morning.

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Visitors were not able to peek around the pop-ups to access the site’s other functionalities.

The message read: ‘Bitcoin Foundation is giving back to the community! Send bitcoin to this address, and we will send double the amount in return.’

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Bitcoin.org is not affiliated with the Bitcoin Foundation – a non-profit trade group that promotes the adoption of digital currency and uses the web address bitcoinfoundation.org.

Bitcoin.org was registered in 2008 in the early days of cryptocurrency, and according to the tech site, is an open-source project aimed at further development of bitcoin. beincrypto.

A ‘cheap scam’ pop-up surfaced on bitcoin.org on Wednesday asking people to send money with the promise of double it. The website appeared offline till Thursday morning

Such scams have been a problem for the cryptocurrency world since at least 2017.

Such scams have been a problem for the cryptocurrency world since at least 2017.

Apparently ‘Giveaway Scam’ First Reported by Cryptocurrency News Site coindesk.

Such scams are a form of social engineering that manipulates people into giving money or personal information, and they have been a problem in the cryptocurrency world for years.

According to the cryptocurrency exchange platform, “The catch here is that in order to participate in the giveaway, you must first send a certain amount of cryptocurrency to a giveaway address so that you can verify your wallet address and receive your share of the giveaway. ” coinbase.

‘However, because cryptocurrency transactions are irreversible, once a victim sends money to a scammer’s address, there is nothing one can do to get it back and the scammer has made a profit.’

As of Thursday morning, one bitcoin is priced at $44,174.68, down from an all-time high of $64,899 on April 13.

The so-called ‘giveaway gang’ made $18 million from scams in the first three-and-a-half months of the year, up from $16 million in 2020. BBC.

One bitcoin is priced at $44,174.68, down from an all-time high of $64,899 on April 13

One bitcoin is priced at $44,174.68, down from an all-time high of $64,899 on April 13

Last year, the real Twitter accounts of Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Elon Musk and Kim Kardashian were hacked by scammers who offered to send $2,000 for every $1,000 sent to an anonymous bitcoin address. The Associated Press.

The hackers eventually created more than $118,000 worth of bitcoins and three people were arrested.

Bitcoin allows users to send and receive money anonymously and without the use of traditionally regulated institutions and banks. Transactions are made public on a ledger, but those handling the money are rarely identified.

They have been used to solicit ransom payments from hackers who gained access to vast networks, such as the Irish health care system or colonial pipelines in the US.

In June, the High Court of London ordered Bitcoin.org to pay $48,000 and stop hosting a bitcoin ‘white paper’, the first document outlining the principles of cryptocurrency written by an unknown person, or persons, Satoshi Nakamoto. Was.

The website was ordered to pay the money to Craig Wright, who is the copyright owner of the white paper.

The website’s anonymous operator, Cobra, was also ordered to host a disclosure on its website about the default decision taken after it did not appear in court.

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