Ditch the popcorn! Bringing a delicious snack to the cinema can RUIN your experience by distracting your brain and making it focus on how the food will taste rather than on the movie itself 

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  • Bringing a delicious snack to the cinema can ruin your experience, says study
  • People enjoy leisure activity less with food because it reduces engagement
  • Popcorn gets your brain focused on what it’ll taste like instead of the movie
  • But sweets can be a useful way to brighten up boring experiences like queuing up.

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Taking popcorn or other dishes to the cinema can be a delicious accompaniment, but New research shows that snacks can actually ruin the experience.

According to experts at Erasmus University, tasty treats can distract your brain and focus on how the food will taste rather than the movie.

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However, scientists say that a snack such as a chocolate biscuit or bag of your favorite sweets may be a useful way to brighten up boring or painful experiences like standing in line.

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New research shows that eating popcorn at the cinema distracts your brain and ruins the experience by focusing on how the food will taste rather than the movie (stock)

How can food make movies less appealing?

New research shows that eating popcorn at the cinema distracts your brain and ruins the experience by focusing on how the food will taste rather than the movie itself.

The study was carried out by the Rotterdam School of Management at Erasmus University.

Researchers found that people were less likely to enjoy leisure activities when there was food around because it reduced their engagement with the experience.

However, the results also suggested that the presence of food may increase consumers’ enjoyment of negative experiences, such as queuing.

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The study, conducted by the Rotterdam School of Management at Erasmus University, found that people enjoyed leisure activity less when they dined around because it reduced their engagement with the experience.

Researchers Dr Anne-Catherine Claesse and Dr Emily Garbinsky said: ‘Companies intentionally use food to create a pleasant customer experience.

‘For example, amusement parks, movie theaters and concert venues all provide food accompaniments to promote the enjoyment of these experiences for customers.

‘However, this research indicates that this strategy may actually backfire.’

Professor Claesse said: ‘Being able to fully enjoy experiences is central to happiness and well-being.

‘Our research provides important insight into which environmental factors can negatively affect consumers’ enjoyment of ongoing experiences.

‘It is important to create a setting in which consumers can be fully connected to get the most out of experiences, such as listening to a concert.

‘The presence of appealing food is harmful because it distracts consumers who are invited to imagine what they will taste next, and it actually reduces engagement and enjoyment with their current experience. ‘

The results also suggest that the presence of food may increase consumers’ enjoyment of negative experiences.

Academics conducted the experiment by asking participants to look at unpleasant pictures and found that food improved their enjoyment of the experience.

Businesses may wish to offer delicious food in situations where consumers engage in less pleasurable experiences, for example in queues, to make the experience less negative.

However, scientists say that a snack such as a chocolate biscuit or a bag of your favorite sweets may be a useful way to brighten up boring or traumatic experiences (stock).

However, scientists say that a snack such as a chocolate biscuit or a bag of your favorite sweets may be a useful way to brighten up boring or traumatic experiences (stock).

The research was conducted in more than 10 studies using a variety of experiences, either in the presence or absence of attractive food, such as cookies or desserts.

Afterwards, people indicated their level of enjoyment of that experience.

One of the experiments, conducted at a concert, looked at how distracted the audience was from chocolate biscuits.

‘We examined for the first time whether there was variation in whether the cookie was present when participants enjoyed the music,’ the researchers wrote.

‘As we expected, those who listened to the music in the presence of Cookie enjoyed the music significantly less than those who listened in the absence of the cookie.’

Results from another task, which saw people performing an artistic activity, showed that those who had a picture of a chocolate biscuit in front of them enjoyed it less than those who did not.

In the third experiment, pudding was brought to a dining hall before students finished their main course.

The research found that those who could see their desserts had less enjoyment of their main meal than the control group.

The study has been published in Journal of Marketing Research,

Scientists are using POPCORN to create eco-friendly insulation

A research team at the University of Göttingen has unveiled insulation boards made from granulated popcorn that are more sustainable and environmentally friendly than petroleum-based alternatives.

A research team at the University of Göttingen has unveiled insulation boards made from granulated popcorn that are more sustainable and environmentally friendly than petroleum-based alternatives.

As countries around the world look for ways to reduce their carbon footprint, the construction industry is a popular target: buildings generate about 40 percent of global CO2 emissions each year, with more than 10 percent Out of which is coming from building materials and construction.

Scientists in Germany have developed a way to make popcorn In an insulation material that is less expensive and more sustainable and environmentally friendly than existing alternatives.

Good insulation lowers heating costs, which reduces CO2 emissions – but some 90 percent of insulation is made of petroleum-based plastics or mineral fibers.

Those non-renewable materials generate carbon during construction and are rarely recycled when a building is torn down, increasing pollution.

A research team at the University of Göttingen has unveiled insulation boards made from granulated popcorn that not only trap heat, but offer good protection against fire and are also resistant to water.

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