England’s MMR vaccine postcode lottery: Just 60% of children in some London boroughs have had the life-saving jab – but uptake is as high as 95% in other areas of the country, NHS figures show

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  • Nine out of 10 two-year-olds in England have received their first MMR vaccine by March, data from the NHS digital show
  • But only six in 10 children in parts of London, about a third less, have received both MMR vaccines by the age of five.
  • Meanwhile, 96.4 percent were vaccinated in County Durham, reflecting disparities between parts of England

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In parts of London, only six in 10 children have received both MMR vaccines, according to official figures, highlighting the vast geographical divide.

NHS data analyzed by MailOnline put the rate among five-year-olds as high as 96.4 per cent in County Durham, which leads the way in England. But in Camden they were reduced to just 59.8 percent.

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Statistics show that after reaching a record high in 2013, the proportion of children achieving their first MMR by age two has fallen over the past eight years.

Experts blame the rise of anti-vaxx sentiment, fueled by bogus claims that the vaccine — which protects against measles, mumps and rubella — can cause autism and bowel disease.

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One virologist warned that it would have to be up to 90 percent faster to thwart measles, which is one of the most contagious viruses known. In England more than half of the local authorities (57 per cent) fall below the threshold.

This has greatly reduced England’s pockets from pockets, reflecting the trends seen in COVID vaccine roll-outs, which have lagged in BAME communities.

The MMR vaccine is given in two doses, the first when the child is one year old and the second when he is three years and four months old.

Measles, mumps, and rubella can be easily spread between unvaccinated people. Infection can lead to serious problems, such as meningitis, hearing loss, and problems during pregnancy.

Two doses of the jab protect about 99 percent of people from measles and rubella, compared to about 88 percent of people with mumps.

This graph shows the proportion of children in England who received their first dose of MMR vaccines from 1988 to 2021 until their second birthday. The figures began to drop dramatically in 1998 when a now-discredited study incorrectly linked jabs to autism. Rates began to climb again in 2004 after reaching a sharp peak of only 79.9 percent in 2003/2004. But in 2014 they started falling again. In 2020, the offtake increased to 90.6 percent, but fell to 90.3 percent in the previous year.

The 10 regions with the lowest MMR vaccine among five-year-olds are in London, with an overall rate of 75.1 per cent.  Only 59.8 percent of youth have received the jab in Camden, compared to 63.7 in the nearby borough of Hackney and 64.1 percent in Westminster.

The 10 regions with the lowest MMR vaccine among five-year-olds are in London, with an overall rate of 75.1 per cent. Only 59.8 percent of youth have received the jab in Camden, compared to 63.7 in the nearby borough of Hackney and 64.1 percent in Westminster.

The countries with the highest uptake are Durham (96.4%), West Berkshire (94.1%), Sunderland (95.4%) and Dorset (95.3%).  The four regions with the highest consumption are in the northeast, which is the region most vulnerable to measles, mumps and rubella (92.5 percent).

The areas with the highest uptake are Country Durham (96.4%), West Berkshire (94.1%), Sunderland (95.4%) and Dorset (95.3%). The four regions with the highest consumption are in the northeast, which is the region with the highest number of children protected from measles, mumps and rubella (92.5 percent).

Between April and June of this year, Public Health England confirmed there was one case of measles and two cases of mumps.  There have been no confirmed cases of rubella in the UK since 2019

Between April and June of this year, Public Health England confirmed there was one case of measles and two cases of mumps. There have been no confirmed cases of rubella in the UK since 2019

Official figures released yesterday showed that just 59.8 percent of children in Camden had received both doses of the MMR vaccine by their fifth birthday in March.

London has all 10 areas with Hackney as the worst performers (63.7 per cent), Westminster (64.1 per cent), Kensington and Chelsea (65.9 per cent) and Haringay (67.7 per cent) round out the top five.

Meanwhile, the counties are the most up-and-coming towns with Durham (96.4%), West Berkshire (94.1%), Sunderland (95.4%), Dorset (95.3%) and Cumbria (95.3%).

NHS digital data also showed that in North Tyneside and Leicestershire more than 19 in 20 young people under the age of five have been double-pocketed.

Overall, the figure for children taking both doses by the time they are five years old is 86.6 percent.

And the national figure for the proportion of two-year-olds getting their first dose is one of the lowest figures for the past decade, including a record-high uptick of 92.7 percent in 2013.

The proportion of children receiving the MMR vaccine had been falling since 2015, but rose to 90.6 percent last year for the first time in six years. However, this figure has now dropped again to just 90.3 per cent of children across the UK.

How do MMR vaccines work?

The MMR vaccine is a safe and effective combined vaccine.

It protects against three diseases: measles, mumps and rubella.

Highly contagious conditions can spread easily between unvaccinated people.

The conditions can cause serious problems including meningitis, hearing loss and problems during pregnancy.

Two doses of the MMR vaccine provide the best protection against measles, mumps, and rubella.

The NHS advises anyone who has not had two doses of the MMR vaccine to ask their GP to make an appointment for the vaccination.

Two doses of the jab protect about 99 percent of people from measles and rubella, compared to about 88 percent of people with mumps.

Source: NHS

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The NHS began rolling out the vaccine as a single dose in 1988, before giving two doses from 1996.

Before MMR vaccines were available, there were hundreds of thousands of cases of measles during the epidemic years. But the disease was effectively eradicated after the vaccine arrived in Britain.

However, a now-discredited study by London doctor Andrew Wakefield in 1998 falsely linked the MMR jab to autism, leading to a drop in vaccine rates and a recent outbreak in 10- to 16-year-olds, who Jobs were missed in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Mr Wakefield studied just 12 children to support the link, but several larger studies have found no difference in the risk of developing autism from the jab.

Later he received General Medical…

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