Events manager who gave up drinking after 10 years of blackouts and hangovers lists the FIVE reasons why you should too – after ditching booze ‘changed her life’ 

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  • Sydney event manager Melissa Leonette stopped drinking in March 2020
  • Ms Leonette, 33, started drinking when she was only 15
  • She quit her job and started coaching others about the benefits of quitting alcohol
  • Ms Leonette recently shared five reminders that help her stay calm

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A high-flying event manager who quit drinking after a decade of daily drinking struggled to get out of bed revealed five reminders that help her stay sober.

Melissa Leonette quit her coveted job to train others about the benefits of going teetotal after her relationship with alcohol got out of control.

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In a recent post on her Instagram account, It’s Not Me, It’s Booze, the 33-year-old Sydneysider said that while she remembers the ‘high’ associated with ‘sometimes’ drinking, she’s learned the hard way that ‘The peak never lasts’.

He said, ‘It is what makes a man who is broken.’

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The Sydney event manager (pictured nearly two years sober in 2021) stopped drinking after over a decade of drinking, leaving him struggling to get out of bed

Ms Leonette (left, in Bali in 2019, and right, nearly two years sober in 2021) began drinking at age 15 and quickly developed a toxic relationship with alcohol.

In times of temptation when she feels she might crack, Ms Leonette says she reminds herself that alcohol reduces the strength of the ‘executive brain’ and increases dependence on the ‘pristine’ part of your brain , which can lead to poor decision making.

‘You become a beast in search of your next peak,’ she said.

The life coach, who has been sober since March 2020, also thinks about the overpowering nature of addiction that makes you forget about your health and who you really are.

He said, ‘You don’t care what’s in the foods you are offered because you just want to reach that peak.’

‘Your body is hot and cold. Your eyes are blurry. Your mouth is dry and you cannot speak. You don’t care if your body is not functioning properly because you need to reach that peak.’

In times of temptation when she feels she might crack, Ms Leonette (pictured) says she reminds herself that alcohol reduces the strength of the 'executive brain' and increases dependence on the 'primary' part , which can lead to poor decision making

The life coach, who has been sober since March 2020, also thinks about the overpowering nature of addiction that makes you forget about your health and who you really are

In times of temptation when she feels she might crack, Ms Leonette (pictured) says she reminds herself that alcohol reduces the strength of the ‘executive brain’ and increases dependence on the ‘primary’ part , which can lead to poor decision making

Five reminders that will help you stay calm

When you drink…

1. You reduce the functionality of your executive brain and start listening to your primal brain. You become a beast in search of your next summit.

2. You don’t care what’s in the substances you offer because you just want to get to that peak.

3. Your body is hot and cold. Your eyes are blurry. Your mouth is dry and you cannot speak. You don’t care if your body isn’t functioning properly because you need to reach that peak.

4. You make inappropriate calls and inappropriate conversations all the time because you need connections to feed that peak even more.

5. You become powerless and lose control. You lose your true self and become someone who doesn’t care about anything other than that peak.

Source: It’s Not Me, It’s Booze

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Ms Leonette said she tries to remember the shameful behavior and serious chats of getting drunk.

“You make inappropriate calls and inappropriate conversations all the time because you need connections to feed that peak even more,” she explained.

‘You become powerless and lose control. You lose your true self and become someone who doesn’t care about anything other than that peak.’

His advice, which has garnered 211 ‘likes’ since being posted online on Sunday, drew dozens of serious reactions.

‘It’s powerful,’ wrote one woman.

A second said, ‘Love it, love you, I can relate to it,’ while a third called Ms Leonette an ‘inspiration’.

Ms Leonette previously spoke to Granthshala Australia about her toxic relationship with alcohol, which began at the age of 15.

Spartan Coach (pictured with a glass of alcohol-free wine in 2021) quits drinking after more than a decade of abuse

Spartan Coach (pictured with a glass of alcohol-free wine in 2021) quits drinking after more than a decade of abuse

Raised by her grandmother, she said she used alcohol to escape when she began to suffer from depression and suicidal thoughts.

Like many teenagers, Ms Leonette began drinking with friends, but quickly found she was always ‘the most drunk at the party’.

“At the time it seemed completely normal, it was fun because everyone was doing it,” she said.

As she began working in hospitality and secured a lucrative gig as an event manager, her drinking became progressively worse, a role that involved frequent schmoozing and driving clients to tasks such as Melbourne races.

‘I always entertained people and it always involved alcohol,’ she recalled.

‘But when it’s part of the job you don’t see it as a problem – it was just my normal, feeling like s**t four days a week.’

Ms Leonette (pictured in 2021) believes that your journey to sober begins the moment you begin to reevaluate your relationship with alcohol

Ms Leonette (pictured in 2021) believes that your journey to sober begins the moment you begin to reevaluate your relationship with alcohol

Ms Leonette said her partner was left dealing with her ever-changing mood swings, indecision, low self-esteem and depression, while she continued to excel at work.

After years of self-loathing and struggling to get out of bed, Ms Leonette resolved to renew her relationship with alcohol.

She signed up for a 30-day detox challenge in 2019, which allowed her to see how different life can be, hangover-free.

‘It gave me a lot of clarity,’ she said, ‘I think your journey of sober begins the moment you start to think about re-evaluating your relationship with alcohol.’

Ms. Leonette dipped in and out of these programs for a year, but always returned to the bottle when the challenge was completed.

To the outside world, she was in control of her life, but behind closed doors the reality was very different.

Ms Leonette (back row, second from left) credits cool social media groups, which have provided her with an online community of like-minded alcohol-free friends (pictured) for keeping her on track over the past 18 months.

Ms Leonette (back row, second from left) credits cool social media groups, which have provided her with an online community of like-minded alcohol-free friends (pictured) for keeping her on track over the past 18 months.

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