Florida eradicates EIGHT-INCH African snail that eats stucco on house and can give people meningitis – for the second time

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  • Florida announced Wednesday that it has eliminated the African giant land snail
  • Since 2011, the state has collected more than 168,000 of the eight-inch-long snails
  • The snails were first discovered in Miami-Dade County and then in Broward County in 2014
  • They were first seen in southern Florida in the 1960s.
  • Snails can reach about 8 inches in length and 5 inches in diameter
  • They carry a parasitic nematode that can cause bacterial meningitis in humans
  • These snails lay about 1,200 eggs per year and have no natural predators

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Florida announced Wednesday that it has eradicated the African giant land snail – an invasive species that can destroy homes and infect people with meningitis – for the second time.

Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried made the announcement at a news conference in Miami’s Douglas Park, where the eight-inch snail was first discovered in 2011.

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Since then, the state has collected more than 168,000 giant African snails (Lischatina fulica, or GAS), in part from dogs that are able to smell them.

In addition to Miami-Dade County, hundreds of snails were found in 2014 in Florida’s Broward County, specifically Western Davy. Surya Prahari.

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Florida announced Wednesday that it has eliminated the African giant land snail. Since 2011, the state has collected more than 168,000 of the eight-inch-long snails

The snails were first seen in Miami-Dade County, Florida in 2011, and in 2014, hundreds of snails were found in Broward County, specifically Western Davey.

The snails were first seen in Miami-Dade County, Florida in 2011, and in 2014, hundreds of snails were found in Broward County, specifically Western Davy.

According to state agriculture departmentThis snail is one of the ‘most harmful’ in the world, eating at least 500 different types of plants.

They do ‘extensive’ damage to tropical and subtropical environments, making snails a serious concern for Florida.

“It will eat your plants, and it will eat your home,” said Trevor Smith, director of the Plant Industry Division and an official with the Florida State Plant Regulatory, according to Sentinel.

‘Our trading partners do not want this insect,’ Smith said.

‘So it was absolutely necessary that we come in and destroy this thing so that it doesn’t affect our international trade.’

Not only are giant land snails considered a threat to the environment, feeding on peanuts, beans and even paint and plaster on homes, they are also a choking hazard to humans, due to the fact that they cause meningitis. are formed that they carry a parasitic nematode.

This time, the snails were discovered in Miami-Dade County in 2011 and again in Broward County in 2014.  They were first seen in southern Florida in the 1960s and it took the state about 10 years and $1 million to get rid of them.

This time, the snails were discovered in Miami-Dade County in 2011 and again in Broward County in 2014. They were first seen in southern Florida in the 1960s and it took the state about 10 years and $1 million to get rid of them.

Parasitic meningitis is less common than viral or bacterial meningitis, but it can affect the brain and nervous system, resulting in headache, stiff neck, vomiting, and sometimes death. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, land snails were first seen in southern Florida in the 1960s and took about 10 years and $1 million to rid of their territory.

These snails reproduce rapidly, producing about 1,200 eggs a year.

“Each snail has both female and male reproductive organs,” the USDA said.

‘After a single mating, each snail can produce 100 to 500 eggs. These snails can reproduce several times without re-mating. They can produce clutches of eggs every 2 to 3 months.

Snails can reach about 8 inches in length and 5 inches in diameter.  They carry a parasitic nematode that can cause bacterial meningitis in humans

Snails can reach about 8 inches in length and 5 inches in diameter. They carry a parasitic nematode that can cause bacterial meningitis in humans

Not only are they hard to eradicate because of their high fertility rates, but they also have no natural predators.

Each snail can live up to nine years and grow up to eight inches in length, roughly the size of an adult’s hand, from the tip of the finger to the crease on the bottom of the palm.

It is unclear how the snails were brought back to Florida in 2011, Smith said at the conference, although a colony was first discovered in 2014 near a home in West Davy.

For a species to be eradicated, it must have been at least three years since it was found alive and the last living GAS was reported in 2017.

Smith said, ‘I am happy to say that there is still only one place on Earth where the giant African land snail has been wiped out, and now we have done it twice.’

In July, 15 of these giant land snails were captured at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport after they were confiscated from the baggage of a Nigerian woman.

In 2013, a woman saw this type of snail in the backyard of her Houston-area home, according to Click2Houston.

The woman eventually contacted officials who alerted researchers at Sam Houston State University.

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