‘Freedom of speech is seriously under threat’: Michael Buerk warns Radio 4 is becoming increasingly ‘woke’ and ‘more and more is being put off limits’ as he fears for future of The Moral Maze 

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  • Freedom of expression at BBC is ‘gravely at risk’, broadcaster warns
  • Moral Labyrinth presenter Michael Burke says Radio 4 is ‘waking up fast’
  • Former newsreader blames social media sites for poisoning public discourse
  • Mr Burke, 75, said his Moral Maze Show is ‘less abrasive’ than before

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Freedom of expression at the BBC is ‘gravely endangered’, a veteran broadcaster has claimed.

Michael Burke, who has presented Radio 4’s The Moral Maze program for more than 30 years, claimed that the corporation was falling prey to ‘conscious ideology’.

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Writing for the Radio Times, the former newsreader warned that Radio 4’s ‘disappointing desire to engage with Euf’ and ‘rapidly waking up’ editorial choices put it at odds with listeners in central England.

Mr. Buerk, who presents live discussion shows about ethical issues, blamed social media sites such as Twitter for poisoning public debate and encouraging people to regard people with opposing views as evil.

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The 75-year-old praised the BBC for being associated with The Moral Labyrinth, but said he was concerned about ‘how long it would last’ and admitted the program was ‘a little less abrasive’ than before.

“In the wider world – and, in some parts of the BBC, it has to be said – more and more borders are being closed, which cannot possibly be said, new conservatives that are beyond challenge,” he wrote. .

‘I think freedom of expression is seriously under threat.’

Freedom of expression at the BBC is ‘gravely at risk’ as corporations fall prey to ‘awake’ ideology, warns veteran broadcaster Michael Burke

Mr Buerk claimed that Radio 4's 'disappointing desire to join the yuf' and 'waking up fast' editorial choices put it at odds with listeners in central England.

Mr Buerk claimed that Radio 4’s ‘disappointing desire to join the yuf’ and ‘waking up fast’ editorial choices put it at odds with listeners in central England.

Mr Buerk added: ‘We pride ourselves on this was an event that “is said to be inexplicable”. There were no restrictions, the audience had grown and they didn’t need protection from ideas they might not like.

‘The arguments weren’t curated or choreographed, and they didn’t require censoring because the whole point of the program was to test them to destroy them.

‘It survives, even in spite of the mood of the times, moderately rich.

‘I wouldn’t say we don’t feel it on the moral labyrinth… Maybe we’re a little less frictionless than we were before. To their credit, the big guys at Radio 4 have pretty much kept their nerves. I respect him for it, but sometimes worry about how long it will last.

‘Half the audience might feel like drowning themselves in their cornflakes after a typical TODAY show, but don’t touch a hair of Nick Robinson’s head (yes, okay, but you know what I mean) and the world will fall.

The former newsreader accused social media sites such as Twitter of poisoning public debate and encouraging people to make people with opposing views feel bad.

The former newsreader accused social media sites such as Twitter of poisoning public debate and encouraging people to make people with opposing views feel bad.

Mr Burke has spent more than five decades at the BBC. He said veteran broadcasters had been “panic” after Sky News anchor Adam Bolton announced he was leaving the station because he had “passed his sale date”.

‘Were there time, he would have been growing up in his 80s. But times change, the boxes they’ve marked so well are now labeled “privileges,” and the old guard is being replaced by a clear, purposeful, less uniformed guard. ,” They said.

The Moral Maze, which first aired in 1990, features a format in which four panelists – renowned historian David Starkey – discuss a topical issue while questioning experts on the subject matter.

The program returned to Radio 4 this week after dealing with issues including taxation and swearing in the previous series.

A BBC spokesperson told MailOnline: ‘Many people are passionate about Radio 4, including Michael, and we are proud of the vast range of quality programming that is as rigorous and curious as ever that caters to the widest range of and represents him. listeners.’

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