Girl, 11, finds rare 2,000-year-old coin in Jerusalem that was minted by a priest in 68BC who joined the Jewish rebels during the Great Revolt against the Romans

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  • 11-year-old Lil Krautkop discovered the coin with his family at the City of David Park in Jerusalem
  • The coin was minted 2,000 years ago during the Great Rebellion, the first Jewish rebellion against the Romans that began in 66BC
  • The currency was probably created by a priest who had just joined the rebellion.

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An 11-year-old girl has discovered a 2,000-year-old coin in Jerusalem that was minted by a Jewish priest who participated in the Great Rebellion – the first Jewish war against the Romans.

Lil Krutkop Unearths Silver Pieces Working With Archaeologists in City of David National Park Israel Antiquities Authority,

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Krutkop said of the moment he found the coin in a statement, “We poured the bucket with the dirt on the sieve, and as we sifted through the stones inside, I saw something round.”

The coin, weighing around 14 grams, has ancient symbols and inscriptions of the Jewish rebellion.

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On one side is a cup and the inscriptions refer to the ‘Israeli Shekel’ and the ‘Second Year’ – the second year of the rebellion (67 to 68 BC).

The other side reads ‘Holy Jerusalem’ in the ancient Hebrew script, followed by another word that refers to the high priest’s headquarters in the temple.

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Lil Krutkop (left) unearths a piece of silver while visiting the town of David Park, where the archaeologist is currently working with his family (here he is with his sister)

Dr Robert Kool, head of the Israel Antiquities Authority’s Coinage Department, said in a statement: ‘This is a rare find, as only 30 of the thousands of coins discovered in archaeological excavations to date are coins made of silver. , from the period of the great rebellion.’

The coins were minted by Jewish rebels as a way of showing their commitment to fighting for the freedom of their people.

The Jewish-Roman War began when the Antipater Idumen began his brutal rule in Jerusalem, a year after the Romans took full control of the Syrian province in AD 63.

The rebellion initially began with religious restrictions imposed on Jews, with the Romans building a city on top of the sacred ruins in Jerusalem.

The coin, weighing around 14 grams, has ancient symbols and inscriptions of the Jewish rebellion.  On one side is a cup and the inscription 'Israel Shekel' and 'Second Year' refer to the second year of the rebellion (67 to 68 BC).

The coin, weighing about 14 grams, has ancient symbols and inscriptions of the Jewish rebellion. On one side is a cup and the inscriptions refer to the ‘Israel Shekel’ and the ‘Second Year’ – the second year of the rebellion (67 to 68 BC).

This included the construction of a Roman pagan temple where a sacred Jewish temple once stood.

Three major wars were fought between the Jews and the Romans over the course of 70 years.

The First Jewish-Roman War lasted from AD 66 to 70; This was followed by the Battle of Kitos, which took place between AD 115 and 117.

In the end, the Bar Kokhba rebellion took place from 132 to 136 AD.

Kool believes that the silver used to make the coin comes from reserves. The Jews were hidden in temples and the currency was probably minted on Temple Mount Plaza.

The theory stems from the fact that the coin was made of high-quality silver and that kool notes were available only in temples.

Such coins were made by Jewish rebels as a way of showing their commitment to fighting for the freedom of their people.  Pictured is the location of the city of David Park where the coin was found

Such coins were made by Jewish rebels as a way of showing their commitment to fighting for the freedom of their people. Pictured is the location of the city of David Park where the coin was found

Currency is a symbol of sovereignty. If you go to rebellion, you use one of the most obvious symbols of freedom, and you mint coins,’ Kool said.

The inscription on the coin clearly expresses the aspirations of the rebels.

‘The choice to use the ancient Hebrew script, which was not in use at the time, is not accidental.

‘The use of this script came to express the longing of the people of the period of the days of David and Solomon and a united Jewish state – the days when the people of Israel had complete freedom in the country.’

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