Global sea levels are rising at an ‘alarming rate’ of 0.12 inches a YEAR thanks to melting ice – with an area of frozen water the equivalent to six times the size of Germany lost since 1979, report warns

- Advertisement -


  • Global mean sea level is rising by about 0.12 inches (3.1 mm) every year
  • This is according to the Fifth Annual Report of the Copernicus Marine Service.
  • The report used a year’s worth of ocean measurements and satellite observations
  • The annual report includes contributions from 150 scientists from over 30 renowned European institutions and is supported by the European Commission

- Advertisement -

World sea levels are rising at an ‘alarming rate’ of 0.12 inches per year, according to a new European Commission-backed report.

This is the fifth Ocean State Report published by the Copernicus Marine Service, using a combination of satellite observations, measurements at various ocean locations around the world, and a range of computer models.

advertisement

The report shows how the ocean is changing and the consequences of those changes, including rising sea levels, warming of the ocean and loss of sea ice.

They found that as oceans warmed and land ice melted, sea levels rose by 0.12 inches (3.1 mm) per year – more than at any time in the past century.

- Advertisement -

The report showed that the extent of Arctic sea ice is shrinking, finding that from 1979 to 2020, it lost sea ice roughly six times the size of Germany.

Dr Alex Arnoll, an environmental researcher at the University of Reading not involved in the report, said level rise is no longer a ‘problem of the future’ and is already causing problems for coastal communities around the world, including in the UK.

The amount of sea ice in the Arctic is well below average and is declining rapidly. In fact, Arctic sea ice has seen a steady decline in expansion and thickness over the past thirty years. Summer (September) sea ice has followed a decreasing trend of -12.89 percent per decade, with record levels of sea ice decreasing over the past two years.

This is the fifth Ocean State Report published by the Copernicus Marine Service, using a combination of satellite observations, measurements at various ocean locations around the world, and a range of computer models.

This is the fifth Ocean State Report published by the Copernicus Marine Service, using a combination of satellite observations, measurements at various ocean locations around the world, and a range of computer models.

Key Findings from the Fifth Ocean State Report

  • Sea level is rising by 3.1 mm per year as ocean warming and land ice melt
  • Arctic sea ice extent is steadily decreasing; Between 1979 and 2020, it lost an area of ​​sea ice roughly 6 times the size of Germany
  • Extreme variability from cold spells and ocean heat waves in the North Sea has been linked to changes in catches of sole, European lobster, sea bass, red mullet and edible crabs.
  • Pollution from land-based activities such as agriculture and industry is causing eutrophication in the ocean, affecting fragile ecosystems.
  • Ocean warming and increase in salinity have accelerated in the Mediterranean Sea over the past decade
  • Warming of the Arctic Ocean is estimated to contribute about 4% of global ocean warming
advertisement

The annual report includes contributions from 150 scientists from over 30 renowned European institutions.

It is meant to serve as a reference for the scientific community, national and international bodies, decision makers and the general public.

They track key ocean monitoring indicators to track how the oceans are changing and analyze impacts.

Ocean indicators are divided into three sets: the physical state of the ocean (blue ocean), the biological and biochemical state of the ocean (green ocean) and the life cycle of floating ice in the polar regions (white ocean).

Other findings include evidence of extreme variability from cold spells and oceanic heatwaves in the North Sea.

These have been linked to changes in catches of sole, European lobster, sea bass, red mullet and edible crabs.

Pollution from land-based activities such as agriculture and industry is causing eutrophication in the ocean, affecting fragile ecosystems.

Eutrophication is where a body of water becomes enriched with minerals and nutrients, sometimes turning it green.

The report found that ocean warming and increased salinity in the Mediterranean have accelerated over the past decade.

The researchers also found that the warming of the Arctic Ocean is now estimated to contribute about four percent of global ocean warming.

Andrew Shepherd, Professor of Earth Observation at the University of Leeds, not involved in the report, said the world is now losing trillions of tons of ice each year.

The blue ocean describes the physical state of the ocean, for example, sea surface temperature, sea level, ocean currents, waves, and ocean winds, as well as the ocean's hearing content, salinity, and density.

The blue ocean describes the physical state of the ocean, for example, sea surface temperature, sea level, ocean currents, waves, and ocean winds, as well as the ocean’s hearing content, salinity, and density.

The green ocean describes the biological and biogeochemical state of the ocean, including, for example, chlorophyll-a concentrations and nutrient uptake, as well as ocean acidification and deoxygenation.

The green ocean describes the biological and biogeochemical state of the ocean, including, for example, chlorophyll-a concentrations and nutrient uptake, as well as ocean acidification and deoxygenation.

The White Ocean refers to the life cycle of floating ice within the polar regions, including indicators, including the extent, volume and thickness of sea ice in the Baltic Sea, the Arctic Ocean, and the Antarctic Ocean.

The White Ocean refers to the life cycle of floating ice within the polar regions, including indicators, including the extent, volume and thickness of sea ice in the Baltic Sea, the Arctic Ocean, and the Antarctic Ocean.

Professor Shepherd explained, ‘Even though the polar regions are remote, we feel their loss as they disturb the oceans around us.

‘Whether rising sea levels are causing more frequent coastal flooding, or a reduction in sea ice cover changing global weather patterns, we are more vulnerable to these changes.

‘The good news is that there is no doubt that these changes are underway; The challenge is to act to avoid further disruption to our lives and livelihoods.

To understand the scale of the changes, the report’s authors focused on various ocean monitoring indicators and tracked how the ocean is changing over time.

Nutrient pollution from land-based activities, such as farming and industry, degrades water quality and increases conditions conducive to eutrophication.  Eutrophication is where a body of water becomes enriched with minerals and nutrients, sometimes turning it green.  However, ocean surface inorganic nutrient depletion can be linked to oligotrophication, which occurs when water is extremely low in nutrients and therefore cannot support the growth of aquatic plants.

Nutrient pollution from land-based activities, such as farming and industry, degrades water quality and increases conditions conducive to eutrophication. Eutrophication is where a body of water becomes enriched with minerals and nutrients, sometimes turning it green. However, ocean surface inorganic nutrient depletion can be linked to oligotrophication, which occurs when water is extremely low in nutrients and…

.

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories