Hanukkah sling stone that was used against Jewish rebels more than 2,000 years ago bears the name of a Greek king who executed a leader of the Maccabees and High Priest of Judea

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  • Small sling stone was found at an archaeological site in Israel
  • It is named for Diodotus Tryphon, an ancient Greek king who ruled the Seleucid Empire between 142 and 138 BC.
  • Tryphon is said to have killed a leader of the Maccabees.
  • It provides evidence of the Hanukkah story, as the holiday honors those who found themselves in the Maccabean rebellion against Greek-Syrian oppressors.

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A newly discovered sling stone in Israel that tells the story of war, bloodshed, and death some 2,000 years ago provides more evidence of the Hanukkah story.

Hanukkah, an eight-day Jewish festival, honors the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem during the 2nd century BCE, where Jews rose up against their Greco-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean rebellion.

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The stone is named for Diodotus Tryphon, an ancient Greek king who ruled the Seleucid Empire between 142 and 138 BC.

Tryphon is said to have killed Jonathan, one of the sons of Mattathias, who was the successor of Judah Maccabee and leader of the Maccabees and high priest of Judea.

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A newly discovered sling stone in Israel that tells a story of war, bloodshed, and death some 2,000 years ago provides more evidence of the Hanukkah story. The stone is named after Diodotus Tryphon, an ancient Greek king who ruled the Seleucid Empire between 142 and 138 BC.

Hanukkah commemorates the Maccabean, or Hasmonean, victory over the forces of the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who ruled from 175 to 164 BC and rededicated the temple.

The rebellion was led by Mattathias Maccabee and his son Judah, who were the first Jews to fight for the defense of their religious beliefs rather than for their lives.

The Maccabean rebellion led to the capture of Jerusalem, the restoration of Jewish worship in the temple, and the Hasmonean dynasty that ruled Judea until 67 BC.

The small stone, found at an archaeological site in the South Hebron Hills, is about three centimeters long and also contains symbols representing the ancient Greek god Zeus. Jerusalem Post Report.

Tryphon is said to have killed Jonathan, one of the sons of Mattathias, who was the successor of Judah Maccabee and leader of the Maccabees and high priest of Judea.  The stone was found at an archaeological site in the South Hebron Hills (pictured)

Tryphon is said to have killed Jonathan, one of the sons of Mattathias, who was the successor of Judah Maccabee and leader of the Maccabees and high priest of Judea. The stone was found at an archaeological site in the South Hebron Hills (pictured)

After Jewish worship was restored at the Second Holy Temple in Jerusalem, Jonathan was appointed as the appointed leader and high priest, and later took the role as army commander of the Maccabees.

In 143 BC, Tryphon invaded Judea and persuaded Jonathan to sack his army of 40,000 soldiers by promising to return an ancient port city in Palestine territory, and other fortresses to the Jews. .

Jonathan agreed to the terms, but when he and the 1,000 men arrived at Ptolemaeus, Tryphon’s army waited.

All of Jonathan’s men were murdered and imprisoned – later executed by Tryphon.

Further evidence of the Hanukkah story was announced last week, when archaeologists discovered the charred remains of a 2,100-year-old Greek fortress that burned to the ground during the Hasmoneans and Seleucids battles.

Further evidence of the Hanukkah story was announced last week, when archaeologists discovered the charred remains of a 2,100-year-old Greek fortress that burned to the ground during the Hasmoneans and Seleucids battles.

Further evidence of the Hanukkah story was announced last week, when archaeologists discovered the charred remains of a 2,100-year-old Greek fortress that burned to the ground during the Hasmoneans and Seleucids battles.

The ancient war began when the Hasmoneans saw Seleucid soldiers stationed in the fort, who were seated on a hill overlooking the Hellenistic city of Maresha.  No fighting took place inside the structure, but Jewish rebels tore down the roof, causing the walls to collapse, and then set their enemy's fort on fire.

The ancient war began when the Hasmoneans saw Seleucid soldiers stationed in the fortress, who were seated on a hill overlooking the Hellenistic city of Maresha. There was no fighting inside the structure, but Jewish rebels tore down the roof causing the walls to collapse – and then set their enemy’s fort on fire.

The Hasmoneans were a dynasty of Jewish kings who fought to liberate Judea from Seleucid rule, a Greek dynasty ruling over a large part of the Middle East.

The ancient war began when the Hasmoneans saw Seleucid soldiers stationed in the fortress, who were seated on a hill overlooking the Hellenistic city of Maresha.

There was no fighting inside the structure, but Jewish rebels tore down the roof causing the walls to collapse – and then set their enemy’s fort on fire.

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