TORONTO – Health Canada has issued a recall and suspended the license for PURE75 gel hand sanitizer after learning that the product contains “advanced levels” of methanol that can cause serious health problems.

- Advertisement -

one in Recall notice issued on ThursdayThe agency said tests on the product found it contained an “undeclared impurity” of methanol, which is not authorized for use in hand sanitizer in Canada.

Health Canada warns, “Continuous exposure to hand sanitizers containing high levels of methanol can cause skin irritation, eye irritation, breathing problems, and headache. If swallowed, methanol can cause serious adverse effects, including death.” can cause a reaction.”

advertisement

By suspending the product license for hand sanitizer, Health Canada says it is now illegal for any person or company to sell this product in the country.

The agency said that the label of PURE75 gel hand sanitizer is also missing important safety information and instructions for use, including the following:

  • - Advertisement -

    Children under two years of age should not use this product

  • Supervise children when using this product

  • Call a Poison Control Center and get medical help if the product is swallowed

  • Keep away from open flames and sources of heat; And

  • use the product occasionally

The affected products are imported by Heavik Industries and have a Natural Product Number (NPN) of 80098346. Health Canada said it would identify Canadians if additional products or safety concerns are identified.

Health Canada said it has requested Heavik Industries to stop selling hand sanitizers and to recall the product, however, the company has not yet complied with the request.

Health Canada is advising retailers to stop selling the affected product and consumers to stop using it immediately.

Health Canada said, “Consult a health care professional if you have used it and have health concerns. If the product is swallowed, call a poison control center or seek medical help immediately. All hand sanitizer should be given to children.” keep out of reach of.”

Canadians are asked to consult their municipal or regional guidelines on how to properly dispose of products. Products may also be returned to local pharmacies for disposal.

Health Canada has released Complete List of Approved Sanitizers for Sale in Canada and Another list of acceptable products, which may not meet full regulatory requirements but are safe for use and will help meet national demand amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Health officials recommend Canadians regularly wash their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds to limit the spread of COVID-19. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer can be used when soap and water are not available.