‘I don’t deserve to eat… I don’t deserve to feel comfortable’: Florence Welch reveals the destructive impact anorexia has had on her life and admits it still affects her thoughts

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Florence Welch has opened up about the impact that anorexia has had on her emotionally.

The 35-year-old Florence and The Machine singer spoke candidly on her struggle with the eating disorder during a recent interview with Rolling Stone magazine.

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During the interview, she explained that the disorder made her think that she doesn’t ‘deserve to eat’ or ‘deserve to feel comfortable’.

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Opening up: Florence Welch, 35, has revealed the destructive impact that anorexia has had on her life in a recent candid interview with Rolling Stone magazine

The star also admitted that despite overcoming the illness, the destructive thinking that comes with it is still prominent in her life – and seeps into her personal life.

She told the publication: ‘Anorexic thinking is still part of my life, even though the anorexia itself isnt.

‘And so, with emotional intimacy, which is kind of like being fed, sometimes you can be like, “No, that’s too much, I don’t need it.”‘

The candid chat comes after Florence admitted that the Covid-19 lockdown resurfaced many anorexic thoughts, noting that it was the closest she had ever been to relapsing.

Destructive: During the interview, she explained that the disorder made her think that she doesn't 'deserve to eat' or 'deserve to feel comfortable'

Destructive: During the interview, she explained that the disorder made her think that she doesn’t ‘deserve to eat’ or ‘deserve to feel comfortable’

Still prominent

Still prominent” She also told the publication: ‘Anorexic thinking is still part of my life, even though the anorexia itself isn’t

Sharing how difficult a time it was, the singer told British Vogue: ‘I really f****** empathise with anyone who did relapse in those two years because I think it was probably the closest I’ve ever thought about it.

‘There were moments when I was like, ‘Should I be starting to cut back on my sugar? Or should I do a cleanse?’ And that for me is just a slippery slope.’

But thankfully, Florence had a supportive group around her to talk things through with, revealing that this was the key to avoiding a relapse.

‘Luckily, I have people I can talk to and that’s one of the most important things for anyone – to keep talking about it. And not to be ashamed if those thoughts come up,’ she explained.

Strong: The Florence + The Machine frontwoman previously spoke out about how the Covid-19 lockdown resurfaced many anorexic thoughts, noting that it was the closest she had ever been to relapsing

Strong: The Florence + The Machine frontwoman previously spoke out about how the Covid-19 lockdown resurfaced many anorexic thoughts, noting that it was the closest she had ever been to relapsing

Florence struggled with anorexia as a teenager, previously opening up about the disorder in her 2018 hit song Hunger.

The singer admitted that her family didn’t know about the disorder until listening to the song, telling NME: ‘It opened up a lot of stuff in my family that was good in the end.’

At the time, she also explained that denying herself nourishment also had an effect on her personal life and emotions.

Continuing: ‘It’s very hard to accept love. If you’ve been denying yourself nourishment in some way, you also have a tendency to deny yourself emotional nourishment.’

WHAT IS ANOREXIA?

Anorexia is an eating disorder and a mental health condition.

People diagnosed with it try to keep their weight as low as possible by eating little or excessive exercise.

Men and women can develop the illness, however it typically starts in the mid-teens.

Those with anorexia can have a distorted image of their bodies, thinking they’re fat when in fact they are severely underweight.

Causes of the condition are unknown, but those with it have either low self-esteem, have a family history of eating disorders or feel pressured from society or place of work.

Long term health complications can include muscle and bone problems, loss of sex drive, kidney or bowel problems or having a weakened immune system.

Treatment for anorexia can include cognitive behavioral therapy.

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