Inside Chelsea Flower Show’s winning garden: Design featuring delicate water lilies, pine trees and ornamental rhubarb plants becomes first Chinese-backed garden to be named Best in Show

- Advertisement -


  • The RHS Chelsea Flower Show opened to the public yesterday after events were postponed from May to September
  • Guangzhou China: Guangzhou Garden won two awards at the event, including the top prize for Best Show Garden
  • The Chinese Garden, designed by Peter Chamil with Chin-Jung Chen, received accolades for the first time in the event’s history

- Advertisement -

A sugar-backed garden filled with water lilies, pine trees and ornamental rhubarb plants has taken the top prize at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show.

The Guangzhou Garden, designed by Peter Chamil and Chin-Jung Chen, became the first Chinese garden in the show’s 109-year history to be named Best in Show by the judges of the Royal Horticultural Society.

advertisement

The Best Show Garden is awarded among the four gold medal winning show gardens on the first day of the event, which is traditionally held in May but has been postponed for the first time in the event’s history due to the coronavirus pandemic. Is.

Run by the government of Guangzhou, China’s fifth largest city, the winning garden aims to inspire global cities to ‘act in harmony with nature’.

- Advertisement -

The Guangzhou Garden, designed by Peter Chamil and Chin-Jung Chen, became the first Chinese garden in the show’s 109-year history to be named Best in Show by the judges of the Royal Horticultural Society.

The garden features a wave of green foliage dotted with frothy perennials in soft shades of white, blue and yellow. Featuring delicate blue Salvia euliginosa that float on top of white and green herbaceous plants and grasses.

Ornamental leaves from rhubarb plants dance over the water while wAter lilies and their lovely pale yellow flowers appear in the garden’s central section, which hides a waterfall and a small planted island.

The winning garden also features a woodland dale to promote clean air, a pool of water, and bamboo shelters for people to gather and home to wildlife. Dawn redwood, Scots pine, field maple and birch tree make up the woodland edge.

Sage, euphorbia and fern plants float on water along with Rogersia and Angelica plants that help clean the water and air.

The garden features a wave of green foliage dotted with foamy perennials in soft shades of white, blue and yellow and features delicate blue Salvia uliginosa that float above white and green herbaceous plants and grasses.

The garden features a wave of green foliage dotted with foamy perennials in soft shades of white, blue and yellow and features delicate blue Salvia uliginosa that float above white and green herbaceous plants and grasses.

The garden was created by landscape architects and first time design duo Peter Chamil and Chin-Jung Chen, who specialize in eco-friendly design and have never before exhibited at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

The garden was created by landscape architects and first time design duo Peter Chamil and Chin-Jung Chen, who specialize in eco-friendly design and have never before exhibited at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

The garden was created by landscape architects and first time design duo Peter Chimil and Chin-Jung Chen who specialize in eco-friendly design and have never before exhibited at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

Guangzhou aims to highlight ‘the benefits of responsible city planning and how people should work in harmony with nature to better connect with the natural world’. Climate change, the growth of large cities and the potential mass extinction of species require a re-evaluation of planning policy. ‘

Elizabeth Waddington, a PDC-qualified garden designer at Horticulture.co.uk, told Femme: ‘This show garden cuts to the heart of one of the most important issues of our time – how humanity can live in harmony with the natural world and An ‘ecological civilization’ can develop – meeting the demands of growing cities while creating work spaces for both people and wildlife.

‘The foliage-rich, lush plantings within this garden represent each of these three ecological regions. At the heart of this best in show garden, laminated Moso bamboo structures, grown sustainably and more easily recycled than most building materials, define areas for people to mingle with nature. and find peace.

Ornamental foliage from rhubarb plants dances over the water, while water lilies and their lovely pale yellow flowers form in the garden's central section, which hides a waterfall and a small planted island

Ornamental foliage from rhubarb plants dances over the water, while water lilies and their lovely pale yellow flowers form in the garden’s central section, which hides a waterfall and a small planted island

‘The lungs of the garden are a woodland grove of attractive trees, which are efficiently intertwined with air-cleaning, carbon sequestering under-story plants – sedges, ferns, euphorbia, angelica, etc.

The ‘kidneys are represented by wetlands filled with aquatic plants that improve water quality, and are accessible via step-stones that allow people to experience these water gardens with their waterfalls and small springs in close quarters. allow. All three regions are connected by lush green foliage of frothy leafy plants.

‘What makes this garden the best is the fact that it so skillfully expresses and displays one of the most important issues of our times – how to reconnect people with nature and ensure that We can relate to the natural world around us in mutually beneficial ways. .

Established in 1913, the flower show has grown to become one of the world’s largest showcases for horticultural excellence, attracting visitors and exhibitors from all over the world.

This year’s event has seen unusual autumn performances after being delayed from May, and instead running from today until Sunday 26 September in a special one-off event.

The winning garden also features a woodland dale to promote clean air, a pool of water, and bamboo shelters for people to gather and home to wildlife.  Dawn redwood, Scots pine, field maple and birch tree make up the woodland edge

The winning garden also features a woodland dale to promote clean air, a pool of water, and bamboo shelters for people to gather and home to wildlife. Dawn redwood, Scots pine, field maple and birch tree make up the woodland edge

It has grown from 244 exhibitors in 1913 to over 500 today, including gardens, nurseries, flowerbeds, educational displays and trade stands. The show attracts 168,000 viewers.

The show is organized by the Royal Horticultural Society, of which the Queen is the patron, and traditionally takes place in mid-May.

Her Majesty, who attends the event every year, is set to leave this year for the first time since 2005 as she lives in Balmoral, where she is expected to stay until October.

This will be only the tenth time that she has missed the flower show. Instead, the Earl and Countess of Wessex, Princess Anne, Duke and Duchess of …

.

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories