Is YOUR Thanksgiving under threat? Massachusetts cranberry harvest is battered by extreme drought as ‘boom or bust’ climate change ravages $1B industry

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  • Extreme drought in Massachusetts is endangering cranberry crops, potentially jeopardizing Thanksgiving cranberry sauce
  • Farmers have felt the effects of drastic changes in weather over the years, from severe storms to sweltering heat
  • ‘We have such a dry summer that people are running out of water. It’s going to be a tough crop for a lot of people,’ said a farmer
  • The Cranberry Industry Contributes to 7,000 Jobs and $1 Billion in the State

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The extreme drought affecting Massachusetts is affecting this year’s cranberry crop — threatening drinks like Thanksgiving cranberry sauce and the Cosmopolitan — while straining an industry that contributes $1 billion to the state.

Farmers are feeling the effects of climate change on a large scale in recent years due to climate change. Two huge storms in 2015 and 2017 filled some cranberry bogs with seawater. Heavy rains last year resulted in picky crops and a nationwide shortage.

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This year, extremely dry conditions started in late spring and didn’t give up. Ten of the 14 counties in the state were experiencing extreme drought and the rest were classified as severe as of August.

‘Climate change that presents a surge or bust scenario, when it comes to rainfall events – large rainfall events, with the bast being prolonged dry spells – is a good one,’ said Zachary Zobel, a scientist at the Woodwell Climate Research Center. It’s not a matter. told in Massachusetts grain to grind,

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Extreme drought affecting Massachusetts is affecting this year’s cranberry crop – threatening drinks like Thanksgiving cranberry sauce and Cosmopolitan

Farmers are feeling the effects of climate change on a large scale in recent years due to climate change.  Two huge storms in 2015 and 2017 filled some cranberry bogs with seawater.  Above: Popular cocktails like the Cosmopolitan require cranberry juice

Farmers are feeling the effects of climate change on a large scale in recent years due to climate change. Two huge storms in 2015 and 2017 filled some cranberry bogs with seawater. Above: Popular cocktails like the Cosmopolitan require cranberry juice

According to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the cranberry industry contributes about 7,000 jobs and $1 billion in annual economic activity in Massachusetts.

Cranberry, which has been cultivated in Massachusetts since 1816, is also well known as a pickling crop. If there is too much rainfall, fungus can form on cranberry vines and affect the color and quality of the fruit. Not having enough water means the berries will not grow properly.

The Cape Cod Growers Association says farmers use fresh water in flooded fields as a management tool to protect plants from cold, dry winter winds, to control pests, and to remove fallen leaves.

Flood is more widely used for harvesting berries. The swamps are filled with up to a foot of water, which is when the cranberries have a perfect color and the water loses its heat.

‘We have such a dry summer that people are running out of water. Rochester resident and selection board member Greenwood Hartley III, who grows 11.5 acres locally, told Sippican Week, it’s going to be a tough harvest for a lot of people.

“We are getting these extreme weather conditions because the weather is changing where it is hotter than normal or more rain than normal,” he said. It is difficult for any farmer. Everyone is really struggling.’

Farmers have about a month before harvesting begins and the recent drought has started to ease some, but they are not completely out of the woods yet.

Brian Vick, executive director of the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers Association, told environmental news outlets: ‘We’ll see what we get for the rain over the next few weeks.

‘Cranberries will continue to flourish in Massachusetts, but it’s going to be more challenging and difficult, and they will have to adapt.’

‘You won’t have that nice, consistent growing season, it just takes one extreme or the other.’

According to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the cranberry industry contributes to approximately 7,000 jobs and $1 billion in annual economic activity in Massachusetts.

According to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the cranberry industry contributes to approximately 7,000 jobs and $1 billion in annual economic activity in Massachusetts.

Cranberry, which has been cultivated in Massachusetts since 1816, is also well known as a pickling crop.  If there is too much rainfall, fungus can form on cranberry vines and affect the color and quality of the fruit.  Not enough water means the berries will not grow properly.

Cranberry, which has been cultivated in Massachusetts since 1816, is also well known as a pickling crop. If there is too much rainfall, fungus can form on cranberry vines and affect the color and quality of the fruit. Not enough water means the berries will not grow properly.

Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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