‘It was out of this world!’: Adventurer Vanessa O’Brien tells MailOnline what it was like to go into space on board Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin rocket – and reveals her incredible never-before-seen souvenir pictures taken from inside the capsule

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  • Vanessa O’Brien, 57, on the company’s sixth crewed mission to Blue Origin on Aug. 4
  • She said the 10 minute 30 second journey was ‘out of this world’ but took a little sweat to land
  • Vanessa had to take a written astronaut test before being launched into space – and score 100 percent
  • Mission NS-22 brings the total number of people sent to space by Blue Origin to 31 since its first launch in July 2021

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A British-American adventurer reveals what it was like to travel in suborbital space for the first time on Jeff Bezos blue original Rocket-Capsule – and has unveiled her incredible souvenir photos exclusively for the MailOnline trip.

Vanessa O’BrienThe 57-year-old experienced the ‘final frontier’ this August and never-before-seen images show her floating around the capsule 65 miles above, wearing blue nail polish that matches her spacesuit. in which the earth forms a charming majestic backdrop.

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The investment banker, who swapped his city career to become an explorer 12 years ago and counts conquering Everest and K2 and reaching both poles among his achievements, told MailOnline Travel that 10 minutes 30 Second’s journey was ‘out of this world’ – but it was an uncomfortable moment as she re-entered Earth’s atmosphere to descend.

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Vanessa O’Brien, 57, on the company’s sixth crewed mission to Blue Origin on Aug. 4

Clint Kelly III, a former member of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), seen on O'Brien's space flight

Clint Kelly III, a former member of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), seen on O’Brien’s space flight

From left to right: O'Brien, Egyptian civilian astronaut Sarah Sebri, Steve Young - the former owner of Florida's largest communications firm - and YouTube star Kobi Cotton

From left to right: O’Brien, Egyptian civilian astronaut Sarah Sebri, Steve Young – the former owner of Florida’s largest communications firm – and YouTube star Kobi Cotton

O’Brien recalled: ‘The biggest surprise for me was to be back in Earth’s atmosphere when we crossed the Karman line, the line used to define Earth’s atmosphere and outer space.

‘We pulled 5.2G and that amount of force was not something we could simulate during training. It pushed us back and down in our seats and we all started sweating.

‘We shouted out to Clint Kelly III, the oldest passenger, to make sure he was okay. I have low blood pressure, but I was seeing my blood pressure skyrocket! None of us will ever forget it – but that’s what it took to penetrate the Earth’s atmosphere.’

Spaceflight company Blue Origin was founded by Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos in 2020 and O’Brien was among thousands who signed up for a flight.

Mario Ferreira, pictured at left, made history as the first Portuguese man civilized to go into space

Mario Ferreira, pictured at left, made history as the first Portuguese man civilized to go into space

Blue Origin's first crewed mission was on July 20, 2021, and O'Brien soon learned she landed a seat on the sixth voyage.  Pictured, his rocket launch in motion

Blue Origin’s first crewed mission was on July 20, 2021, and O’Brien soon learned she landed a seat on the sixth voyage. Pictured, his rocket launch in motion

Three red and white parachutes were shot from the capsule in eight minutes and 30 seconds, helping propel the craft back to the ground for a soft landing in the Texas desert, with retro thrusters ensuring that it touched down at about 1mph. Go.

Three red and white parachutes were shot from the capsule in eight minutes and 30 seconds, helping propel the craft back to the ground for a soft landing in the Texas desert, with retro thrusters ensuring that it touched down at about 1mph. Go.

O'Brien is seen wearing a drinkable MRI by South Korea's iMediSync, in an effort to measure the 'observational effect' on the brain before and after his space flight.  The observation effect is a change in awareness that many astronauts feel after their journey

O’Brien is seen wearing a drinkable MRI by South Korea’s iMediSync, in an effort to measure the ‘observational effect’ on the brain before and after his space flight. The observation effect is a change in awareness that many astronauts feel after their journey

Explaining what inspired him to do so, he said: ‘For me, space was the last frontier. I saw the earth from the earth…

Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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