Military leaders in Burma (in charge of what Myanmar likes to call) have for years scattered the veneer of democratic rule from the ugly military authoritarian regime hidden beneath the surface.

In fact, the thugs running the country have made a dent in everything from political repression to organized crime and genocide. His uncountable action provides some insight for the runaway Biden administration to deal with the world’s bad boys.

FILE - In this January 27, 2021, file photo, Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi witnessed the vaccination of health workers at a hospital in Nyepitawa, Myanmar.  Reports said that a military coup took place in Myanmar on Monday, February 1, 2021, and Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest.  (AP Photo / Ang Shine Oo, File)

FILE – In this January 27, 2021, file photo, Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi witnessed the vaccination of health workers at a hospital in Nyepitawa, Myanmar. Reports said that a military coup took place in Myanmar on Monday, February 1, 2021, and Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest. (AP Photo / Ang Shine Oo, File)

Janta would object to calling his overt takeover a “coup”. They would argue that what they did is in line with the country’s constitution. And they should know. He wrote the constitution.

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Nevertheless, the notion that military leaders can just topple an elected government, whenever they want, is highly disgusting for those who believe in human freedom. And is “disgusting” correct word, Whether you call it a coup or not. At the end of the day, Burma’s military leaders are nothing but thugs.

be frank. The civil government was far from perfect. Arguably, civil rulers were embroiled in the oppression of the Rohingya and other minorities in the country – some of the world’s worst human rights abuses today. Nevertheless, a freely elected civilian government – no matter how misguided – offers a more promising future for the Burmese people and the region than the iron-forged military regime.

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This tragic state of events provides some lessons for President Biden’s team as they handle keeping Americans safe, independent and prosperous in a sea of ​​world-troubles.

The number one lesson clearly does not go back to Obama’s policies. In Cuba, Venezuela, Russia and Iran, the way he lightened up, Obama tried to normalize relations with Burma. He Supporting the sanctions, we hope that our generosity will trigger better behavior. This naive strategy with Burma failed, as it did in those other countries.

The fact is that despite donating to the democracy trap in 2010, who wore military uniforms in Burma, they never gave power to suits or sarongs in Parliament. (In fact, at least 25% of the seats in the Constitution are reserved for the military in Parliament.)

The generals only wanted to create an illusion of representative government to justify “engagement” to the international community and to turn a blind eye to the regime’s continuing misdeeds.

It is a fantasy that Washington could embark on a democracy agenda by engaging with the Burmese army.

Unfortunately, that cynical strategy worked – at least not with Washington.

The generals are likely to stick to their successful gamut so far. They will set new timelines for change in democracy, and hope that it will be enough to give them 10 years of engagement and an eye-popping among civilized nations.

The Biden administration and Congress should not buy it. It is a fantasy that Washington could embark on a democracy agenda by engaging with the Burmese army.

So far, the Biden team is playing it right.

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On Sunday, the administration demanded that the military release the detained civilian leaders and warned that it would “take action” if the junta did not return. On Monday, the administration said it would consider reinstating at least some sanctions against the regime that had been relaxed in the past decade. The best move the Biden team could make was to slap back those restrictions – fast and harsh.

The new administration should take another lesson from the antics of Burma’s military:

The US cannot do anything except confrontation, blunt and unquestioned relations with Beijing. The fact that China is ready to enact this regime (and other vigorous totalitarian regimes like Venezuela and Iran) – even in front of the international opprobrium – is a reminder that Beijing is anything but a creative on the world stage Is the force.

The argument that we cannot be too strict on Burma because it would give China space to strengthen its relations with the military leadership is complete nonsense. Beijing’s relationship with Burma is already outside Washington. It is this same logic-and-competition with China that led America to normalize relations in the first place. Did not work

The US should now see the sanctions lifted or waived in the last decade. We justified it faster and more broadly than on-the-ground reforms in Burma. The “coup” bears this judgment.

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