Just 1% of people in England make up nearly a THIRD of ambulance call-outs, 16% of A&E visits and cost NHS £2.5bn a year, report finds

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  • An analysis of NHS data found that 367,000 people (about 1% of the population) attend A&E 346 times per year
  • This group of people is responsible for about 1 in 3 ambulance call outs and more than 1 in 6 of total A&E visits
  • People from the most disadvantaged areas of England were more likely to be part of this 1% group than were in wealthier areas
  • Report shows valid causes with 7.5 times higher risk of death due to regular A&E attendances
  • Some people told researchers they were forced to go to A&E because they didn’t get an appointment with a GP
  • The charity, the British Red Cross, says these people need more access to support to help ease the pressure on the NHS

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One report found that just 1 percent of people in England account for about a third of ambulance call outs and 16 percent of A&E visits.

An analysis by the British Red Cross found that 367,000 people – the equivalent of 0.67 percent of the population – are putting excessive pressure on the health system.

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The charity found that these people visit A&E an average of seven times a year, but some go to emergency departments hundreds of times each year.

A fifth of repeat attendants lived alone, suggesting that many were turning to healthcare to cope with loneliness and social isolation. Others accepted to use A&E because they didn’t get a GP appointment.

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In terms of ambulance call outs, of the approximately 5 million ambulances that come to A&E every year, 29 percent are frequent users.

These people also accounted for 2.6 million, 16 percent of the nation’s 15 20 million non-minor-injury A&E visits a year. The Red Cross estimates that this group of people is costing the NHS £2.5 billion a year.

It comes amid an A&E crisis that has seen thousands of patients die in overcrowded emergency departments, and triple the ambulance calls they should be.

And last month, Health Secretary Sajid Javid warned that large numbers of people were coming and putting ‘significant pressure’ on A&E because they could not see GPs face-to-face.

Only 1 per cent of A&E users in England, mostly from disadvantaged areas, are using large amounts of A&E services, accounting for 29 per cent of total ambulance call outs, 16 per cent of total A&E attendance and total hospital admissions. of 26 percent.

People who frequently attended A&E were almost always more likely to die than the general population, for example those who attended A&E frequently in their 30s and 40s were more likely to die It was 7.5 times more common in the general population than people his age.  One notable exception was in the '80s, people in this demographic were less likely to die if they frequently attended A&E, perhaps due to a greater likelihood of finding health problems.

People who frequently attended A&E were almost always more likely to die than the general population, for example those who attended A&E frequently in their 30s and 40s were more likely to die It was 7.5 times more common in the general population than people his age. One notable exception was in the ’80s, people in this demographic were less likely to die if they attended A&Es frequently, perhaps due to the greater likelihood of finding health problems.

Emergency services in England are in crisis as thousands of patients are dying in overcrowded emergency departments, and ambulance call times triple what they should be

Emergency services in England are in crisis as thousands of patients die in overcrowded emergency departments, and ambulance call times triple what they should be

The British Red Cross analyzed data from 376,000 people who frequent emergency departments in England over six years, and also interviewed GPs and hospital staff. They found that people who regularly attended A&E were more likely to live in disadvantaged areas of England.

At least 4,500 patients have died due to overcrowding and 12-hour ambulance handover delays at A&E

Over 4,500 patients have died due to overcrowding and 12-hour waits at A&E in the past year, a damning report has revealed.

The report from the Royal College of Emergency Medicine highlights the deadly crisis facing the NHS A&ES as the healthcare system recovers from the pandemic.

It found that one in 67 patients in England suffered ‘extra loss’ between 2020 and 2021 due to overcrowding in emergency departments and delays in handovers.

Overall, the RCEM estimated that 4,519 patients lost their lives in England, but acknowledged this may have been an ‘underestimation’.

Dr Adrian Boyle, vice president of the college, said: ‘To say that this figure is shocking is an understatement. Quite simply, the mob kills.’

Elsewhere in the UK, the death toll due to A&E delays was estimated at around 700 in Wales, 300 in Scotland and 556 in Northern Ireland.

Dr Boyle said: ‘The situation is unacceptable, unstable and unsafe for patients and staff.

‘Political and health leaders should realize that more and more patients will be at the emergency department at avoidable harm if performance continues to decline this winter.

‘Employees will suffer moral injury and the urgent and emergency care systems will face the worst.’

He called on the government to increase the bed capacity to pre-pandemic levels with over 7,100 beds required to reduce waiting times.

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These people were more likely to experience sudden life changes such as job loss, relationship breakup or grief, combined with social and economic issues.

According to the study, housing insecurity, loneliness and mental health issues were other common factors.

The analysis also found that the death rate among people aged 30–49 who frequently attend A&E was 7.5 times higher than the average for the age group in the general population.

Overall, those in their 20s were most likely to participate in A&E repeatedly, accounting for 16 percent of total repeat emergency service users.

Those who frequently attend A&E told British Red Cross researchers that they often felt unheard.

The charity said high intensity use services, which are run by the NHS and the voluntary sector, could have a positive impact on reducing admissions among vulnerable people.

High-intensity access services, which provide ongoing support to frequent users, including providing mental support and patient advocacy for other health services, can reduce attendance at A&E by 84 percent in just three months.

While there are around 100 high intensity use services in England covering mental health, A&E, primary and secondary care, not all hospitals have access to a dedicated service.

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