Just one in ten new motors has a handbrake as brands switch to electronic systems – but they’re far more expensive to fix

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  • Only 13% of all models sold in UK showrooms today have a manual handbrake
  • Manufacturers are increasingly transitioning to electronic parking brakes
  • CarGurus predicts that by 2030 handbrakes in new cars will be a thing of the past
  • 17 out of 38 brands reviewed no longer sell cars with manual handbrake
  • While electronic systems require less effort to operate and auto-adjust, they cost an average of £666 to repair

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Controls that have been a feature of cars for decades are fast disappearing from the latest models, according to a new market review.

It found that only 13 per cent of motors in UK showrooms today come with a manual handbrake, which looks set to become a forgotten component in vehicles before the end of the decade.

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Most of the remaining 87 per cent of new cars have electronic parking brakes, which experts warn are far more expensive to fix if they go wrong – an average of £446 more expensive in fact.

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Braking on car parts: only 13% of all new car models sold in the UK are fitted with a manual handbrake as brands continue to switch to electronic systems

The report is the fifth annual review of how many cars are being sold with handbrake installed, a number that has fallen steadily year after year over the past half decade.

In 2018, CarGurus – the online used car platform – found that over a third (37 per cent) of models across the brand range had a manual handbrake.

However, it has decreased each year to 30 percent in 2019, 20 percent in 2020, and only 17 percent last year.

Yet the 2022 review shows that there is no let up in how quickly parts are being dropped from cars by brands.

It found that household names including giants BMW and Peugeot have all removed handbrakes from their existing cars in the past 12 months together.

The report found that 17 of the 38 manufacturers it reviewed no longer sell cars with manual handbrake – that’s 45 percent of brands.

In 2018, CarGurus found that 37% of models in the brand's range had a manual handbrake.  It has decreased every year to 30% in 2019, 20% in 2020 and only 17% last year

In 2018, CarGurus found that 37% of models in the brand’s range had a manual handbrake. It has decreased every year to 30% in 2019, 20% in 2020 and only 17% last year

While electronic parking brakes offer motorists easy operation and adjust automatically, if something goes wrong they are far more expensive to repair than a traditional handbrake.

While electronic parking brakes offer motorists easier operation and adjust automatically, they are far more expensive to repair than traditional handbrakes if something goes wrong.

The BMW X1, M230i xDrive coupe and M4 convertible all now feature an electronic parking brake, while Peugeot has discontinued its only manual-handbrake product, the 108 city car.

In addition, the Citroen C1 and Nissan Micra, both of which feature a manual handbrake, have been discontinued in the UK in the last 12 months.

Meanwhile, Audi continues to offer a manual handbrake in just 1 percent of its models, while Vauxhall has dropped two out of five (40 percent) of its manual handbrake vehicles, with models like the Combo Life and Vivaro Life opting for an electric one. are facing. Facelift and switch to electronic parking brake in 2022.

Abarth is the only manufacturer in the UK to offer a manual handbrake in its product portfolio, although an electric Abarth 500 – based on the Fiat 500 Electric – is set to be unveiled this week and will not have a handbrake.

Some brands, including Mercedes, also offer parking foot brakes, operated by an additional lever in the pedal box – although these are becoming increasingly rare.

This table shows how many models each manufacturer sells with a manual handbrake.  Legendary brands BMW and Peugeot have both dropped them from their cars in the past 12 months

This table shows how many models each manufacturer sells with a manual handbrake. Legendary brands BMW and Peugeot have both dropped them from their cars in the past 12 months

Electronic parking brake repair costs £446

While electronic parking brakes offer easy operation for motorists – activated with the push of a button and automatically released when the driver presses the accelerator – and adjust themselves, they can act like a conventional handbrake if something goes wrong. are far more expensive to repair than

We asked warranty provider MotorEasy to tell us the average price difference. While fixing a manual handbrake cost an average of £220 over the past five years, the average garage receipt to fix a faulty electronic parking brake was £666 – a difference of £446.

MotorEasy’s extended warranty data also shows that more than a quarter (27 per cent) of electronic parking brake claims cost more than £1,000, compared to 18 per cent of manual handbrake claims.

The most expensive repair on its record was a bill of £2,889 to fix the electronic parking brake system on a Range Rover Sport.

The switch to electric vehicles at the end of the decade will end the manual handbrake in new cars forever

The switch to electric vehicles at the end of the decade will end the manual handbrake in new cars forever

It added that Land Rover was the brand most commonly afflicted with parking brake issues, followed by BMW.

And electronic parking brake issues aren’t what you’d call rare.

In 2017, Volkswagen was forced to recall 766,000 cars globally – 134,000 of which were UK models, due to a recurring problem with the electronic parking brake.

It influenced the hugely popular Golf hatchback, Touran MPV, Tiguan SUV and the Passat family of saloons and estates.

That same year, Tesla issued a worldwide voluntary recall of 53,000 Model S and Model X vehicles due to parking brake malfunctions, while Audi, Renault and Toyota also had to recall the models for similar issues with their electronic parking systems. Past.

While CarGurus had earlier predicted that the manual handbrake would only last till 2030.

From that date new petrol and diesel cars are banned, only fully electric vehicles – and some hybrids – will be allowed to be sold in the UK. All of them will have electronic parking brakes.

Yet the online platform says the current rate at which handbrakes are being removed from model ranges by manufacturers means the traditional interior part may not make it past the end of the decade.

CarGurus UK editor Chris Knapman said: ‘The fifth installment of our manual handbrake report shows…

Credit: www.thisismoney.co.uk /

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