Kansas fisherman captures nearly 40-pound ‘living fossil’ alligator gar – a species which dates back 100 million years 

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  • An alligator gar was caught in Kansas for the first time on September 20
  • They have been seen in Ohio, Missouri, Illinois and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • 4.5-foot fish known as ‘living fossil’ because records can trace them back to about 100 million years ago
  • They are known for their long snouts and ability to grow 10 feet and weigh up to 350 pounds
  • The fish were plentiful in the mid-20th century, but misconceptions led to overfishing and are now considered endangered.

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A crocodile gar, known as a ‘living fossil’, has been caught in Kansas for the first time – and no one knows how it got there.

The 39.5-pound, 4.5-foot fish, referred to as ‘living fossils’ because records can trace them back to about 100 million years ago,’ said angler Danny Lee Smith on a fishing trip on September 20 Neosho was caught in the river. according to a Statement From the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks.

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Currently, experts aren’t sure how the fish were injured in the Neosho River, but are considering a few different options to unravel the mystery.

They will look at the fins of the fish to see if it has come from another state.

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Smith fished the Neosho River on a September 20 fishing trip

The alligator gar was caught for the first time in Kansas last month because it doesn’t live in the state.

Currently, experts aren't sure how the fish got injured in the Neosho River (pictured)

Currently, experts aren’t sure how the fish got injured in the Neosho River (pictured)

Jeff Koch, KDWP assistant director of fisheries research, said: ‘Since most populations of this species can be distinguished from each other with a fish fin sample, the other option we are considering is genetic identification. .

‘This will tell us whether the fish has come from existing populations in another state.’

The Alligator Gar is known for its distinctive long snout and ability to grow 10 feet in length and can weigh up to 350 pounds.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service said the fish, which can reach 10 feet in length, was once seen quite frequently in the Mississippi River.

They have traditionally been seen in parts of Ohio, Missouri and Illinois up to the Gulf of Mexico.

They have traditionally been seen in parts of Ohio, Missouri and Illinois up to the Gulf of Mexico.

They have traditionally been observed in parts of Ohio, Missouri and Illinois down to the Gulf of Mexico. US Fish and Wildlife Service, but never Kansas.

‘When it first came out of the water… I was shocked, I was stunned. I’ve seen gar jumps, but didn’t do anything,’ says fishing angler Danny Lee Smith CNN.

‘It’s a once-in-a-lifetime deal, I’m sure.’

Given the long distance from where they are commonly found, experts aren’t sure how crocodile necks originated in Kansas’s Neosho River.

If the above option doesn’t provide the answer, Koch said experts can use micro chemistry.

It involves measuring the element ratio of a bone on a fish and comparing it to the elements in the surrounding water.

Doug Nygren, director of the KDWP Fisheries Division, explained that it was probably not a pet that was lost or released into the wild when it had ‘grown too big’.

‘These techniques should allow us to determine which mode of introduction occurred.

The state agency notes that bringing non-native species into the area poses a risk of spreading disease and is illegal, whether native or not.

“Transporting and releasing fish risks spreading other harmful species, such as microscopic zebra mussels, fish disease, or aquatic vegetation, present in waters used to transport fish,” warns Chris Stephen, KDWP Aquatic Nuisance Species Coordinator.

The alligator gar is known for its distinctive long snout and ability to grow 10 feet in length and can weigh up to 350 pounds

The alligator gar is known for its distinctive long snout and ability to grow 10 feet in length and can weigh up to 350 pounds

There are many species of gar, but alligator gar has been used to make many different items, from fish scales to arrowheads, jewelry and tools.

The USFWS said it is also used for leather goods and its oils are used as an insect repellent.

Fish, which were plentiful in the middle of the 20th century, caught more fish due to the misconception that they eat fish that people also eat.

It is now considered rare and endangered, according to University of Florida.

Why are alligators attracted to humans?

Alligator gars are known for their long bodies, long snouts, and diamond-shaped interlocking scales.

It has many fins, the tail fins are rounded and its dorsal and anal fins are on the rear side of the body.

Some versions of the gharial gar can reach up to 10 feet in length and weigh over 300 pounds.

Like their reptilian namesake, adult crocodiles have two rows of large teeth on their upper jaw.

These fish, which can live for decades in some cases, have been used from fish scales to make all kinds of consumer goods, such as arrowheads, jewelry, and tools.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service said it is also used for leather goods and its oils are used as an insect repellent.

They are dangerous to humans, but reports of attacks are rare. Their eggs, which hatch in a couple of days, are considered poisonous if eaten by a person.

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