Keira’s stodgy Christmas pudding, a very cheesy romcom and a big fat Netflix turkey: BRIAN VINER reviews Silent Night 

- Advertisement -


Silent Night (15, 92 min)

- Advertisement -

Verdict: Wrapping-Paper Thin

Rating:

advertisement

Boxing Day (12a, 109 mins)

Verdict: Love Really Ripped

- Advertisement -

Rating:

A Castle for Christmas (PG, 98 min)

Verdict: A Sleigh Accident

Rating: Turkey!

We In December, the traditional sign for movie distributors is to push Santa down the chimney and pretend it’s already Christmas.

And so, or possibly lo, as if the three wise men may have timed their travels a bit wrong, there’s a trio of Christmas movies coming out this week, none of which bring much comfort, yet deliver less joy. Is.

Silent Night marks the debut of writer-director Camille Griffin, whose real-life son Roman Griffin Davis (JoJo Rabbit) plays Art, a potty-mouthed kid deeply concerned with the upcoming poison-cloud apocalypse and a government-sponsored whole. Not sure at all. The mass suicide plan is designed to avoid unnecessary suffering (pills are available from Exit.gov.co.uk).

Christmas: Silent Night marks the debut of writer-director Camille Griffin, whose real-life son Roman Griffin Davis (Jojo Rabbit) plays Art, a child terrified of a poison-cloud apocalypse.

Christmas: Silent Night marks the debut of writer-director Camille Griffin, whose real-life son Roman Griffin Davis (Jojo Rabbit) plays Art, a child terrified of a poison-cloud apocalypse.

That’s the premise, with the added zing that this global Armageddon arrives at Christmas, Art’s parents Nell (Keira Knightley) and Simon (Matthew Goode) make the most of their impending demise by hosting a gathering of beloved old kisses in the grand set to take advantage. Country house given to her by her mother (Truddie Styler, who gets a fleeting Zoom cameo).

Obviously, very frankly in fact, there are satirical messages in all of this about our own pandemic and about climate change. In fairness, some good ideas pulsate softly at the heart of the film.

But it turns out to be an undergraduate review sketch that extends far beyond her natural life, and the social/sexual politics of the middle-class House Party are almost unbearably shallow and fanciful, a derivative of Peter’s Friends (1992). , not to mention the disturbing memories that awaken.

Silent Night is undermined even more by thin characterization than cheap festive wrapping paper, as a bunch of caricatures tick boxes of diversity of sexuality and ethnicity, and kids swear like soldiers (young in the cast). Roman’s younger twin brother) also marked acuity to tick another box

Announced as the UK’s first Christmas romcom with a mostly black cast, Boxing Day doesn’t get much better.

Celebration: Armageddon arrives at Christmas with Art's parents Nell (Keira Knightley - pictured) and Simon (Matthew Goode), determined to make the most of their demise.

Celebration: Armageddon arrives at Christmas with Art’s parents Nell (Keira Knightley – pictured) and Simon (Matthew Goode), determined to make the most of their demise.

It’s also a first foray, with actor Amal Amin not only writing and directing for the first time, but also starring as Melvin, a wildly successful British novelist living in Los Angeles who is engaged to his beloved American fiancée Lisa ( Aja brings Naomi King) into a panic. ) Head back to London to experience the traditionally packed Boxing Day gathering of your Anglo-Caribbean family.

Soon, they are both caught up in an emotional scuffle, fueled by family resentment and his sudden breakup with ex-girlfriend Georgia (Leigh-Anne Pinnock of girl band Little Mix), who happens to be a now-famous pop. Star.

Inevitably, Lisa is a huge fan, without even knowing Melvin’s romantic affair. Perhaps especially for those of us a little allergic to Love Actually (2003), which Boxing Day clearly resonates, none of it is particularly appealing.

There are some strong performances (notably by Marianne Jean-Baptiste as Melvin’s mother) and yet, even though the story is clearly semi-autobiographical, almost all of the relationships feel synthetic, leaving both the comedy and poignancy feeling forced. .

Still, Boxing Day and even Silent Night are true masterpieces, along with the Netflix film A Castle for Christmas, with poor acting, silly plot, and terrible dialogue and the first cinematic turkey of the season.

Brooke Shields prepares a big slab of over-steamed Christmas ham as Sophie Brown, a bestselling US-based author (yup, another) who somehow…

,

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories