Lidl ordered to melt copycat chocolate Lindt bunnies

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Lidl is ordered to destroy her foil-wrapped chocolate bunny after a Swiss court ruled that it was identical to the original Lindt version.

Switzerland’s highest court ruled on Thursday that Lindt and Spruengly’s chocolate bunnies deserve protection from counterfeit products, including a version of German discount supermarket Lidl that was ordered to stop selling its product and liquidate remaining stock. has given.

Lindt’s Chocolate Bunny – wrapped in gold foil with red ribbon and small bell, and in sitting posture – is sold in a variety of sizes and is one of the Swiss brand’s best-selling products, most notably Popular in Easter season.

The Federal Court said that the surveys submitted by Lindt showed that the Easter Bunny was well known to the public, adding that there was a potential for confusion, even though there were some differences between the two products.

This overturned a Swiss commercial court ruling against Lindt in favor of Lidl’s two Swiss units last year and ordered Lidl to destroy its remaining chocolate bunnies.

Highest Swiss court orders Lidl’s remaining stock of chocolates to be destroyed

“Destruction is proportionate, notably it does not mean that chocolate has to be destroyed,” it said in a summary of its decision.

Lidl confirmed that its chocolate bunnies have been discontinued only in Lidl Switzerland, but will still be sold in other Lidl supermarkets outside the country, including the UK.

Swiss premium chocolate maker Lindt has fought several court battles to protect one of its best-selling products.

Germany’s federal court ruled last year that the gold tone of its foil-wrapped Easter bunny had trademark protection.

The company applied for a trademark on the three-dimensional shape of its bunny in 2000, which was granted the following year.

After a protracted battle between Lindt and Austrian rival chocolate maker Hauswirth, the issue of whether the chocolate bunny could be trademarked came before Europe’s top court, the European Court of Justice, which ruled a gold-wrapped chocolate rabbit with a ribbon around its neck. Make it too. ,

Credit: www.independent.co.uk /

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