Major glaciers in the Dolomites, Yosemite, Yellowstone and Kilimanjaro will DISAPPEAR by 2050 due to global warming, report warns 

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  • UNESCO monitors about 18,600 glaciers in 50 World Heritage Sites around the world
  • In a new report, it warns that a third of them will disappear by 2050 due to global warming
  • This includes Dolomite in Italy, Yosemite and Yellowstone in the US, and Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.
  • The other two-thirds could be saved by keeping global temperature rise below 1.5 °C (2.7 °F).

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According to UNESCO, whatever the scenario of temperature rise, global warming will cause some of the world’s most famous glaciers to disappear by 2050. report good,

This includes the Dolomites in Italy, Yosemite and Yellowstone Park in the United States, and Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

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UNESCO monitors about 18,600 glaciers out of its 50 World Heritage Sites and says a third of them are set to disappear by 2050.

While the rest could be saved by keeping global temperature rise below 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) relative to pre-industrial levels, in a business-as-usual emissions scenario, about 50 percent of World Heritage glaciers could disappear almost entirely. Is. till 2100.

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According to a UNESCO report, global warming will cause some of the world’s most famous glaciers to disappear by 2050, regardless of the rise in temperature. Pictured: Glacier at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro

UNESCO monitors about 18,600 glaciers out of its 50 World Heritage Sites and says a third of them will disappear by 2050.

UNESCO monitors about 18,600 glaciers out of its 50 World Heritage Sites and says a third of them will disappear by 2050.

Which glaciers are at risk?

Africa

  • Glaciers in all World Heritage Sites including Kilimanjaro National Park and Mount Kenya

Asia

  • Glaciers in three parallel rivers of Yunnan Protected Areas (China)
  • Glaciers in the western Tien-Shan (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan)

Europe

  • Glacier in the Pyrenees Mont Perdu (France, Spain)
  • Glaciers in the Dolomites (Italy)

Latin America

  • Glaciers in Los Alers National Park (Argentina)
  • Glaciers in Huascaran National Park (Peru)

North America

  • Glaciers in Yellowstone National Park (US)
  • Glaciers in Yosemite National Park (US)
  • Glaciers at Waterton Glacier International Peace Park (Canada, US)

Oceania

  • Glacier at Te Wahipounamu (New Zealand)
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The 50 World Heritage Sites included in the report are home to about 10 percent of the Earth’s glaciers.

But the report warns that these glaciers are retreating at an accelerated rate since 2000 due to carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which are warming temperatures.

Together, the glaciers are losing 58 billion tons of ice each year – equivalent to the combined annual water use of France and Spain.

What’s more, they are responsible for about five percent of global sea-level rise.

Worryingly, the report concludes that glaciers in a third of 50 sites will disappear by 2050 – regardless of efforts to limit temperature rise.

In Africa, it includes all the glaciers in Kilimanjaro National Park and World Heritage Sites including Mount Kenya.

In Asia, the three parallel rivers of the Yunnan Protected Areas and glaciers in the western Tian-Shan are at risk.

And in Europe, the glaciers of the Pyrenees Mont Perdu and The Dolomites are very likely to disappear by 2050.

But there is hope.

UNESCO says that if global temperature rise is kept below 1.5 °C (2.7 °F), it is still possible to save glaciers in the remaining two-thirds of the sites.

UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay said: ‘This report is a call to action.

‘Only a rapid reduction in our CO2 emission levels can save glaciers and the extraordinary biodiversity that depend on them.

‘COP27 will have an important role to play in helping to find a solution to this issue.

‘UNESCO is determined to support the states in pursuing this goal.’

As well as reducing carbon emissions, UNESCO is calling for an international fund to monitor and protect glaciers.

Images from 2000 (left) and 2019 (right) show how the glacier at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in the United Republic of Tanzania has retreated

Images from 2000 (left) and 2019 (right) show how the glacier at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in the United Republic of Tanzania has retreated

Landsat images from 1999 (left), 2016 (middle) and 2021 (right) show both the retreat and separation of the Uppsala Glacier from the Bertachi Glacier in Los Glaciares National Park in Argentina.

Landsat images from 1999 (left), 2016 (middle) and 2021 (right) show both the retreat and separation of the Uppsala Glacier from the Bertachi Glacier in Los Glaciares National Park in Argentina.

This fund can be used to implement early warning and disaster risk reduction measures.

According to UNESCO, half of the world’s population is directly or indirectly dependent on glaciers as their water source.

It added that glaciers are also ‘pillars of biodiversity’ and feed into many ecosystems.

IUCN Director-General Dr Bruno Oberle said, “When glaciers melt rapidly, millions of people face water shortages and the risk of natural disasters such as floods increases, and sea level rise displaces millions of people.” can be.”

‘This study highlights the urgent need to cut greenhouse gas emissions and invest in nature-based solutions, which can help mitigate climate change and allow people to better adapt to its impacts .’

Copernicus Sentinel-2 image from 2019 of the Jakobshavn Isbre Glacier in the Ilulissat Icefjord in Denmark.  The red arrow indicates the glacier's terminus position in 2000, the orange arrow the 2010 position and the yellow arrow the 2019 position.

Copernicus Sentinel-2 image from 2019 of the Jakobshavn Isbre Glacier in the Ilulissat Icefjord in Denmark. The red arrow indicates the glacier’s terminus position in 2000, the orange arrow the 2010 position and the yellow arrow the 2019 position.

Worryingly, the report concludes that glaciers in a third of 50 sites will disappear by 2050 – regardless of efforts to limit temperature rise.  Image: Simplified diagram of glacier dynamics

Worryingly, the report concludes that glaciers in a third of 50 sites will disappear by 2050 – regardless of efforts to limit temperature rise. Image: Simplified diagram of glacier dynamics

Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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