MARTIN SAMUEL: Steve Bruce’s inevitable sacking by Newcastle will be the saddest all season… the club means more to him as a local man than whoever replaces him, but he was NEVER deemed good enough by his own kind

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  • The end was inevitable for Steve Bruce at Newcastle, even the man knew that
  • No he didn’t play his football there, but Sir Bobby Robson didn’t either
  • So the biggest sadness for Bruce was that he was never good enough for them.
  • Bruce’s side could have taken more risks, but what if they hadn’t paid up?

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The ending was inevitable, even Steve Bruce knew it. Yet, for all this, it is hard to imagine a sadder dismissal in football this season than what happened in Newcastle on Wednesday.

It doesn’t matter who gets to the club now. Paulo Fonseca, Eddie Howe, Lucien Favre, even Steven Gerrard. Newcastle wouldn’t mean to any of them what it meant to Bruce. He was a local man, a trait that some people still pretend to be valuable around those parts.

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No, he did not play his football there, but neither did Sir Bobby Robson, who had been 49 years in the game as a player and manager, before taking a job north of Birmingham.

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The end was inevitable for Steve Bruce (in the middle) at Newcastle, even as the man himself knew that

Newcastle will never mean to replace Bruce for Paulo Fonseca or the other candidates that matter to him

Newcastle will never mean to replace Bruce for Paulo Fonseca or the other candidates that matter to him

So the biggest sadness for Bruce was that he was never good enough for them. It is never too good for your kind. He was not so much a rascal as he was seen as a travelman’s manager and Newcastle’s followers think they are older than him.

Former player Warren Barton said, ‘When this acquisition came out 18 months ago, it was about Mauricio Pochettino taking over. ‘That’s what I think of when I think of Newcastle managers.’

And this is strange because since Barton’s arrival in 1995, Newcastle managers have included John Carver, Glen Roeder, Joe Kinnear, Graeme Souness, Chris Hughton, Sam Allardyce, Steve McLaren and, for 185 games, Alan Purdue. has done.

Where Barton gets the idea that Newcastle is the natural home of the most talented coaches in Europe is a mystery. He got Rafael Benitez, but he was on a rebound. So most marquee appointments were, for that matter, even Robson.

He was a local man, did not play his football there, but neither did Sir Bobby Robson (L)

He was a local man, did not play his football there, but neither did Sir Bobby Robson (L)

Mike Ashley saw Bruce as a secure pair of hands; A manager who knew the Premier League and could keep the club out of the Championship until its sale. It wasn’t always pretty or amusing, but it served its purpose. And Newcastle found their buyer.

A look at the road to Sunderland shows what can happen when a club is cut off from its Premier League revenue stream. There are no billionaire saviors on the horizon from the Gulf in Wearside.

Not that Bruce got any thanks from his tormentors when the end came. Not only from social media trolls, but also from people for whom BeKind is nothing more than a virtue-signaling hashtag.

The man himself spoke of the humiliation and the effect it had on his family with more sadness than bitterness.

Those who brag about getting their club back, meanwhile, forget that it was Bruce’s club too, and he would love nothing more than to work with the resources and positivity that Robson and Kevin have. Keegan was covered in happy times.

So the biggest sadness for Bruce was that he was never good enough for him, his kind.

So the biggest sadness for Bruce was that he was never good enough for him, his kind.

Yes, Bruce’s Newcastle could have taken more risks, but what if those risks didn’t pay off? His solution was to keep Newcastle safe.

Keegan’s great entertainers took the title; Bruce couldn’t ignore his acronym for popularity. given what was at stake

Now Fonseca is the favorite for the job. A hired gun, passing. Fonseca was a traveling player—which Bruce certainly was not as captain of Manchester United and the winner of more titles than Newcastle in the previous 113 years—with a checkered record as a coach.

He has impressed with smaller clubs such as Pacos Ferreira, but failed when he was given the job of plum at Porto in 2013.

Fonseca took over a club that had won back-to-back titles, but Porto were sacked by nine points from Benfica during their first season in March.

Bruce was seen as a secure pair of hands by Mike Ashley (L);  a boss who knew the premier league

Bruce was seen as a secure pair of hands by Mike Ashley (L); a boss who knew the premier league

He flourished in Ukraine with Shakhtar Donetsk, less so with Roma, who finished seventh when Fonseca was replaced by Jose Mourinho.

Yet on Tyneside Fonseca will be welcomed in a way Bruce never was because he brings with him an air of glamour, of mystery, of excitement.

And if it doesn’t go well, he looks back because it’s a lot of a European coach and Fonseca will have worked in his fourth country and counting.

There was no secret about Bruce, with his mid-half nose and inspiring strategies. Everyone had an in-depth knowledge of all of its 1,000 games, even about his managerial career.

Every high, every low, every promotion or relegation. He reached the dirty shop. Who knows whether Fonseca’s second stint at Pacos Ferreira – in eighth place – was good, bad or indifferent?

Those who were raving about getting their club back after the takeover forgot that it was also Bruce's club.

Those who were raving about getting their club back after the takeover forgot that it was also Bruce’s club.

Gerrard may form a strong connection with fans, as he has at Rangers, but we all know that when he dreams of winning the league, the ribbons on the trophy are red, not black and white.

And that’s what makes Bruce’s departure so sad. When he looked around St. James’s Park before everything turned bad on Sunday, he got a glimpse of what might have happened. The city was buzzing, flags were waving, local heroes were buzzing as the teams fled.

This is how Bruce would have imagined he would feel as Newcastle manager. At least he experienced it once.

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