More than a dozen cast-iron cannonballs from the epic Acre Bombarded battle in 1840 are found hidden in the walls of Israel’s Underground Prisoners Museum 

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  • Eighteen cast-iron cannon balls are found in the walls of the underground Prisoners Museum in Acre, Israel
  • The cannonballs are the remains of the battle of the 1840 Acre Bombing
  • The battle saw a European and Ottoman alliance against the Egyptians.
  • This ended with the death of over 1,000 Egyptians, and the lands were restored to the Ottoman Empire.
  • The museum was originally a fort, but was converted into a prison in the early 1900s when British rule came to power

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More than a dozen cast-iron cannonballs have been hidden in the walls of Israel’s Underground Prisoners Museum in Acre for 181 years.

The facility was recently under construction when workers found ancient weapons, which archaeologists say were fired during the Acre Bombing War in 1840.

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The war involved European troops working with the Ottoman Empire to overthrow a strong Egyptian rule in Israel.

A total of 40 hits from cannonballs were counted in the walls of the museum, as well as 18 cannonballs that fit in the palm of your hand.

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More than a dozen cast-iron cannon balls have been hidden in the walls of Israel’s Underground Prisoners Museum in Acre for 181 years

The coalition consisted of Austrian and British troops, who came to the aid of the Ottomans to bomb the port city of Acre and drive out the Egyptian garrison. Israel Education Center.

The epic battle took place on November 3, 1840, in which 1,100 Egyptians were killed and the Ottomans regained control of their lands.

Roy Liran, patron of the Israel Antiquities Authority, said in a Statement: ‘The British and Austrian navies join forces to bomb Acre at noon on November 3, 1840.

The Ottoman Empire and European powers led a British-directed military campaign against the Egyptian governor Muhammad Ali, who took control of the region in 1831.

The war involved European soldiers working with the Ottoman Empire to overthrow a strong Egyptian rule in Israel.

The war involved European soldiers working with the Ottoman Empire to overthrow a strong Egyptian rule in Israel.

The facility was recently under construction when workers found ancient weapons, which archaeologists say were fired during the Acre Bombing War in 1840

The facility was recently under construction when workers found ancient weapons, which archaeologists say were fired during the Acre Bombing War in 1840

‘European powers assisted Ottoman rule, preferring a weak Turkish rule of the region over a strong Egyptian rule.

‘This dramatic battle ended in a British-Austrian victory that ensured Ottoman rule for the next 50 years.’

From 1516 to 1918, Acre was, except for brief intervals, under Ottoman Turks rule.

The Underground Prisoners Museum was originally a fort built on the ruins of a Crusader fortress in the Ottoman era.

In 1918, Acre was taken over by the British Army and the fort was converted into a prison facility.

Hundreds of members of underground organizations – Haganah, Etzel and Lehi – were imprisoned here because of their struggle to protect the ghetto, the war against the British Mandate, and their right to establish a national home in the Land of Israel.

With 18 cannonballs that fit in the palm of your hand, the museum's walls counted a total of 40 hits

With 18 cannonballs that fit in the palm of your hand, the museum’s walls counted a total of 40 hits

The museum plans to leave cannon balls in the walls as a memory of the Great Battle of 1840

The museum plans to leave cannon balls in the walls as a memory of the Great Battle of 1840

The museum commemorates the prisoners who were sentenced to death, along with underground fighters who used the facility to counter their British rulers.

However, the structure is reminiscent of a time when the British and the Ottoman Empire worked together to take back the land.

The museum plans to leave cannon balls in the walls as a reminder of the Great Battle of 1840.

Hani Schacher Fischman, director of the Underground Prisoners Museum, said in a statement: ‘Exposing the cannonball adds another layer to the story of the Haganah, Ezel and Lehi underground prisoners to whom the museum is dedicated.

Ammunition, hit intensity, and shooting angle provide a fascinating opportunity to identify the positions of warships in the Gulf of Acre and in front of the city walls, which are moments of terror experienced by Egyptian soldiers defending the city. reflect. .’

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