Move over James Bond! World’s first hands-free JETPACK prototype is unveiled with top speeds of 30mph – and it could take to the skies in 2022 

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  • The Maverick Jetpack has an in-built autopilot system and is intuitive to control
  • It uses a vertical take-off and landing system, and can reach 30mph . can reach the speed of
  • Developers hope it could be used to enter structures that are difficult to access, including wind turbines and construction sites in the near future

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From James Bond to The Jetsons, jetpacks have been a staple in blockbuster movies for years.

Now, the technology is slowly but surely becoming a reality, with one company claiming to be the world’s first hands-free jetpack prototype.

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Maverick Aviation has developed a device called the Maverick Jetpack, which it claims will travel at 30 mph and could be ready by 2022.

Unlike most current jetpacks that require intense training to get the hang of it, the Maverick jetpack has an in-built autopilot system and is intuitive to control, according to the team.

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The developers hope that the device could be used to enter structures that are difficult to reach, including wind turbines and construction sites, in the near future.

The Maverick jetpack is the brainchild of Hollywood animatronics specialist Matt Denton (pictured left) and Royal Navy Commander Antony Quinn (pictured right).

Unlike most current jetpacks, which require intense training to get the hang of it, the Maverick jetpack has an in-built autopilot system and is intuitive to control, according to the team.

Unlike most current jetpacks, which require intense training to get the hang of it, the Maverick jetpack has an in-built autopilot system and is intuitive to control, according to the team.

What can it be used for?

The developers hope that the device could be used to enter structures that are difficult to reach, including wind turbines and construction sites, in the near future.

Mr Quinn said: ‘I realized that the growing onshore and offshore wind industry really needed a solution like this.

‘Their engineers climb stairs inside these structures for hours every day and, in an emergency, it is nearly impossible to get down quickly.

‘Drones can be useful for inspections, but in many circumstances you need to get an engineer in there.’

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The Maverick Jetpack is the brainchild of Hollywood animatronics expert Matt Denton and Royal Navy Commander Antony Quinn.

Mr Quinn said: ‘I realized that the growing onshore and offshore wind industry really needed a solution like this.

‘Their engineers climb stairs inside these structures for hours every day and, in an emergency, it is nearly impossible to get down quickly.

‘Drones can be useful for inspections, but in many circumstances you need to get an engineer in there.

‘During the tours in Afghanistan and Iraq, the number of potential use cases kept growing and I realized how big the opportunity was. The potential is almost endless.

‘Before, with people using £30m helicopters to perform some simple tasks, we can provide a more tailored solution at a fraction of the cost.’

His device alumnus, is made from lightweight materials including titanium and carbon fiber, and will travel at speeds of up to 30mph, depending on the task.

It will use a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) system, and is powered by a miniature jet engine around the size of a rugby ball.

However, what really sets it apart from other devices is the in-built autopilot system.

His device alumnus, is made from lightweight materials including titanium and carbon fiber, and will travel at speeds of up to 30mph, depending on the task.

His device alumnus, is made from lightweight materials including titanium and carbon fiber, and will travel at speeds of up to 30mph, depending on the task.

It will use a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) system, and is powered by a miniature jet engine around the size of a rugby ball.

It will use a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) system, and is powered by a miniature jet engine around the size of a rugby ball.

Mr Quinn explained, ‘The unique thing about what we are doing is the computer controlled autopilot system that makes flight smoother and easier to control with precision.

‘This is how we changed the jetpack from exciting to useful.

‘Flying is so intuitive that the cost of training is going to be low, so you’ll have all kinds of professionals suddenly able to work safely and quickly in the most inhospitable environments.’

According to the developers, the first manned test flight is scheduled for next summer.

According to the developers, the first manned test flight is scheduled for next summer

According to the developers, the first manned test flight is scheduled for next summer

The developers hope that the device could be used to enter structures that are difficult to reach, including wind turbines and construction sites, in the near future.

The developers hope that the device could be used to enter structures that are difficult to reach, including wind turbines and construction sites, in the near future.

Karen Taylor, Group Head of Grants at Catax, which is helping fund the project, said: ‘What Antony and Matt are doing is the stuff of dreams.

‘When we think of jetpacks, a lot of Hollywood scripts come to mind, but this is the first time such a versatile device is being built at the forefront of commercial use cases.

‘They’ve achieved an incredible amount so far, and it’s wonderful that a British company is leading the way on such a significant, game-changing technology.’

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