Mysterious mummy dating back up to 1,200 years is discovered in an underground tomb in Peru with its whole body tied up by ROPES and its hands covering its face

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  • Man’s remains found at Cajamarquilla archaeological site
  • It is located about 16 miles from the country’s coastal capital, Lima.
  • The mummy – whose gender is unknown – was from pre-Inca civilization
  • Rope tying, experts said, would have been part of local funeral patterns
  • Excavations in the tomb have also revealed ceramic artifacts and various stone tools.

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Archaeologists excavating an underground tomb in Peru have uncovered a strange mummy completely bound in ropes, with hands covering its face.

The remains of a man whose gender has not been identified were found at the Cajamarquilla archaeological site, about 16 miles from the capital, Lima.

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According to the team, the mummy is 1,200-800 years old and belonged to a pre-Inca civilization that developed between the Peruvian coast and mountains.

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Archaeologists excavating an underground tomb in Peru have uncovered a strange mummy that is completely roped in, with hands covering its face, as shown in the picture

The remains of the man, whose gender has not been identified, were found at the Cajamarquilla archaeological site (pictured), about 16 miles from the capital Lima.

The remains of the man, whose gender has not been identified, were found at the Cajamarquilla archaeological site (pictured), about 16 miles from the capital Lima.

Cajamarquilla Archaeological Site

Cajamarquilla is an archaeological site about 16 miles off the coast of Lima.

It was first settled by the Huari around 400–600 AD, but later appropriated by peoples including both the Yachama and the Inca.

The city’s sports sections of mud-brick dwellings and pyramids are believed to have been built for the Huari warriors.

Sadly, the site is poorly treated despite official recognition – a quarter has been destroyed and the rest threatened by urban sprawl.

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The excavations at Cajamarquila are led by archaeologist Peter Van Delon Luna of California State University San Marcos.

“The main feature of the mummy is that the whole body was tied with ropes and the face was covered with hands,” said Professor van Dalen Luna.

This elaborate bond, he explained, ‘will be part of the local funeral pattern.’

The mummified individual, Professor Van Delen Luna explained, lived in the High Andean region of Peru about 600-200 years before the rise of the Inca people.

‘Radiocarbon dating will give a more accurate chronology,’ he said.

The underground tomb in which the mummy was found also contained other funeral offerings.

Archaeologists said that among these discoveries were stone tools and ceramics containing traces of vegetable matter.

The team said the nature of the burial indicated that the area may have been multi-ethnic in the late pre-Hispanic period.

According to the team, the mummy (pictured) dates back to 1,200-800 years ago and was related to the pre-Inca civilization that developed between the Peruvian coast and mountains.

According to the team, the mummy (pictured) dates back to 1,200-800 years ago and was related to the pre-Inca civilization that developed between the Peruvian coast and mountains.

Leading archaeologist Peter Van Delen Luna of California State University San Marcos said,

“The main feature of the mummy is that the whole body was tied with ropes and the face was covered with hands,” said lead archaeologist Peter Van Delen Luna of California State University San Marcos.

The detailed bonding of the mummy, Professor van Dalen Luna explained, 'will be part of the local funeral pattern'.  Pictured: Professor van Dalen Luna (right) with archaeologist Yomira Huaman Santillon (left) and the bound mummy (center), in the latter tomb

The detailed bonding of the mummy, Professor van Dalen Luna explained, ‘will be part of the local funeral pattern’. Pictured: Professor van Dalen Luna (right) with archaeologist Yomira Huaman Santillon (left) and the bound mummy (center), in the latter tomb

Peru is home to hundreds of archaeological sites derived from cultures that flourished before and after the Inca Empire.

The Inca once dominated the southern part of South America, from southern Ecuador and Colombia to central Chile, and first arose in the Peruvian highlands in the early 13th century.

The Inca Empire fell at the hands of the Spanish conquistadors, who launched their invasion in 1532 and seized the Inca’s last stronghold in 1532.

The mummified individual, Professor Van Delen Luna explained, lived in the High Andean region of Peru about 600-200 years before the rise of the Inca people.  Image: Cajamarquilla Archaeological Site, which covers about 167 hectares

The mummified individual, Professor Van Delen Luna explained, lived in the High Andean region of Peru about 600-200 years before the rise of the Inca people. Image: Cajamarquilla Archaeological Site, which covers about 167 hectares

The remains of a man whose gender has not been identified were found at the Cajamarquilla archaeological site, about 16 miles from the capital Lima.

The remains of a man whose gender has not been identified were found at the Cajamarquilla archaeological site, about 16 miles from the capital Lima.

Why did ancient South American cultures sacrifice their children?

Child sacrifice seems to have been a relatively common occurrence in ancient Peruvian cultures, including the pre-Incan Sican, or Lambayeque culture, and the Chimu people, as well as the Inca themselves.

Among the discoveries revealing this ritual behavior are the mummified remains of a child’s body, discovered in 1985 by a group of climbers.

The remains were uncovered at a distance of about 17,388 feet (5,300 m) on the southwestern ridge of the Cerro Aconcagua Mountains in Argentina’s Mendoza province.

Child sacrifice seems to have been a relatively common occurrence in ancient Peruvian cultures.  Among the discoveries revealing this ritual behavior were the mummified remains of a child's body (pictured), which were discovered in 1985 by a group of climbers.

Child sacrifice seems to have been a relatively common occurrence in ancient Peruvian cultures. Among the discoveries revealing this ritual behavior were the mummified remains of a child’s body (pictured), which were discovered in 1985 by a group of climbers.

The boy is believed to have been the victim of an Inca ritual called capacocha, where children of great beauty and health were put to death by being drugged and carried into the mountains.

The ruins of a sanctuary used by the Inca to sacrifice children to their gods were discoveredarchaeologist At a coastal ruins complex in Peru in 2016.

Experts excavating at Chotuna-Chornancap in northern Lima discovered 17 tombs dating back to at least the 15th century. It consisted of the graves of six children placed side by side in pairs of shallow graves.

Capacocha was a ritual that often took place at the death of an Inca king. Local lords were required to select immaculate children who represented the ideal of human perfection.

The ruins of a sanctuary used by the Inca to sacrifice children to their gods were discovered by archaeologists in 2016 at a coastal ruins complex in Peru.  Experts excavating at Chotuna-Chornancap (pictured) in northern Lima discovered at least 17 tombs.  15th century

The ruins of a sanctuary are used by…

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