NASA reschedules spacewalk outside of the ISS for Thursday after being forced to cancel it due to a potential collision between the craft and space debris that was likely created by Russia’s anti-satellite test

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  • NASA is set to conduct a spacewalk on Thursday that was canceled on Tuesday due to space debris
  • Astronauts Thomas Marshburn and Kayla Barone will replace a faulty radio communications antenna
  • The postponement of the spacewalk was announced at 1:01 AM ET and the walk was scheduled for 7:15 AM ET
  • SpaceX said it had to move its Starlink satellites to avoid a collision
  • It is not clear whether the debris came two weeks before Russia blew up one of its own satellites

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The NASA spacewalk that was postponed yesterday due to rouge space debris has been rescheduled for Thursday, Dec.

Tuesday’s walk was scheduled to see astronauts Thomas Marshburn and Kayla Barron venture outside the International Space Station at 7:10 a.m. to replace a faulty radio communications antenna — and the pair are set to try again tomorrow. Is.

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“The delay in the spacewalk provided an opportunity for NASA to evaluate the risk from debris notification,” the agency shared in a blog post.

Along with NASA, SpaceX was also forced to move things around in order not to be affected by the debris.

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CEO Elon Musk revealed on Twitter that his company had to move some Starlink satellites to avoid a collision.

The billionaire shared the news on Twitter, Musk shared in a tweet, adding that the ISS and docked Dragon capsule have micrometeorite shields to protect them from debris, while astronaut suits do not pose a ‘high risk for spacewalks’.

The space junk is believed to stem from Russia’s anti-satellite weapons test two weeks ago, when the nation blew a defunct satellite of its own into orbit and created a 1,500-piece debris field.

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The NASA spacewalk that was postponed yesterday due to Rouge space debris has been rescheduled for Thursday, December 2. Astronauts Thomas Marshburn (left) and Kayla Barron (right) will venture outside the International Space Station tomorrow.

A cloud of debris created by Russia’s test forced seven crew on the ISS to temporarily take refuge in their return ships.

NASA TV planned to provide live coverage of the spacewalk’s ‘Extra Vehicle Activity,’ or EVA, operation.

The outing would have been the fifth spacewalk for Marshburn, 61, a medical doctor and former flight surgeon with two previous trips to orbit, and Barron, 34, a US Navy submarine officer and nuclear engineer on his first spaceflight for NASA. It would have been the first spacewalk.

Thursday’s spacewalk will aim to remove a faulty S-band radio communications antenna assembly, now more than 20 years old, and replace it with a new spare outside the space station.

NASA was today forced to suspend a spacewalk outside the International Space Station (ISS) after receiving a 'debris report' to the orbital outpost.  NASA announced the change by sharing a tweet at 1:01AM ET

NASA was today forced to suspend a spacewalk outside the International Space Station (ISS) after receiving a ‘debris report’ to the orbital outpost. NASA announced the change by sharing a tweet at 1:01AM ET

Elon Musk revealed that SpaceX had to move some of its Starlink satellites into orbit to avoid a collision with space debris that forced NASA this morning to postpone a spacewalk outside the International Space Station (ISS).

Elon Musk revealed that SpaceX had to move some of its Starlink satellites into orbit to avoid a collision with space debris that forced NASA this morning to postpone a spacewalk outside the International Space Station (ISS).

Pictured is astronaut Thomas Marshburn as he prepared to do a spacewalk

In the picture is astronaut Kayla Barron who was also on her way to walk outside the International Space Station

Astronauts Thomas Marshburn and Kayla Barone were set to venture outside the sprawling orbiting laboratory at 7:10 a.m. for six-and-a-half hours to replace a faulty radio communications antenna.

Marshburn and Baron will make changes while deployed at the end of the robotic arm, which will be operated from inside the station by German astronaut Mathias Maurer of the European Space Agency (ESA), who will be assisted by NASA’s Raja Chari.

Four astronauts arrive at the ISS together in a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

And they join two Russian cosmonauts and a NASA cosmonaut already aboard the orbiting laboratory.

Russia blew up one of its own satellites on 12 November using a missile that US analysts believe was the A-235 PL-19 Nudol 'satellite killer' missile.  Cosmos 1408, a defunct spy satellite launched in 1982, was the destroyed target, resulting in a field of 1,500 pieces threatening the crew of the ISS.

Russia blew up one of its own satellites on 12 November using a missile that US analysts believe was the A-235 PL-19 Nudol ‘satellite killer’ missile. Cosmos 1408, a defunct spy satellite launched in 1982, was the destroyed target, resulting in a field of 1,500 pieces threatening the crew of the ISS.

Although anything can happen while in space, seven people were unprepared for what happened a few days later.

On 12 November, Russia blew up one of its own satellites, which American analysts believe was the A-235 PL-19 Nudol ‘satellite killer’ missile.

The satellite was orbiting about 300 miles above Earth’s surface at the time, and created a debris field between 270 miles and 320 miles from the surface.

The ISS orbits about 260 miles above the surface, although Monday was a little less than 250 miles, meaning debris passed over it from a distance of about 20 miles as their orbits crossed.

It is unclear whether Tuesday’s debris stems from an incident two weeks ago, when Russia blew one of its own dormant satellites into orbit, resulting in 1,500 pieces of debris, endangering the crew of the ISS. Were.

Astronauts aboard the ISS were ordered by Houston Mission Control to seek safety inside the ship’s escape pods.

The cloud of residual debris from the detonated satellite has since disintegrated, according to Dana Weigel, NASA’s deputy manager of the ISS program.

Although NASA has not yet fully determined the additional hazards posed by the more than 1,700 large fragments, it is tracking around the station’s orbit, a seven percent greater risk to astronauts than previously observed in the ‘natural environment’. Gone falls ‘well within’ the volatility, Weigel said.

Still, mission managers canceled several minor maintenance tasks under consideration for Tuesday’s spacewalk, Weigel said.

What is Space Junk? More than 170 million dead satellites, spent rockets and paint flakes ‘threat’ the space industry

There are an estimated 170 million pieces of so-called ‘space junk’ – left behind after missions that could be as large as spent rocket stages or as small as paint flakes – some US$700 billion (£555bn) in space. In the classroom with infrastructure .

But only 27,000 are tracked, and with…

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