New Orleans overtakes St. Louis to become the MURDER CAPITAL of America: Homicide rate up 141% from 2019 and carjackings rise 210% – as city’s police staffing drops to lowest level in modern history

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  • Analysis of 2022 murder statistics ranks New Orleans as US murder capital
  • The city recorded 41 murders per 100,000 residents in the first half of the year.
  • It speeds the Big Easy to the top of last year’s killer leader, St. Louis
  • Crime skyrockets in NOLA as city struggles to recruit police
  • Although police budgets have increased, staffing is among the lowest in modern history.
  • Haven’t been able to find recruits to replace officers leaving New Orleans
  • Police say a 2013 consent decree imposed excessive punishment for minor violations

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New Orleans overtook St. Louis as America’s murder capital in the first half of this year, as the city struggles with its lowest police staff level in modern history amid a crisis of officer morale.

In the first six months of 2022, New Orleans recorded 41 homicides per 100,000 population, a higher murder rate than any other US city, according to a wall street journal Analysis of data from the Major Cities Chiefs Association.

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By comparison, the murder rate per 100,000 in the first half was 11.5 in Chicago, 4.8 in Los Angeles, and 2.4 in New York City.

In New Orleans, the murder rate has increased by 141 percent compared to 2019, while shootings have increased by 100 percent, carjackings by 210 percent and armed robberies by 25 percent. Metropolitan Crime Commission,

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New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell rides a horse to Zulu Roll’s Crewe in March. The city now has the highest homicide rate in the US, according to a new analysis

In New Orleans, the murder rate has increased by 141 percent compared to 2019, while shootings have increased by 100 percent, carjackings by 210 percent and armed robberies by 25 percent.

In New Orleans, the murder rate has increased by 141 percent compared to 2019, while shootings have increased by 100 percent, carjackings by 210 percent and armed robberies by 25 percent.

New Orleans Police Department member N.  Pierce investigates a carjacking scene on St. that resulted in the death of an elderly woman in New Orleans in March.

New Orleans Police Department member N. Pierce investigates a carjacking scene on St. that resulted in the death of an elderly woman in New Orleans in March.

a separate analysis The Rochester Institute of Technology last year ranked St. Louis as the US homicide capital, with a full-year murder rate of 61 per 100,000.

New Orleans will easily top that if the current 2022 trend holds up with a full-year homicide rate of 82, compared to the city’s second-place rate of 56 last year.

Since the FBI has not released its nationwide Integrated Crime Report since the 2019 reporting year, it becomes difficult at times to compare homicide rates in different cities.

However, available sources show that violent crime rates have soared in many cities across the country, a surge that has led to psychological and financial stress from the pandemic as well as police cuts in response to Black Lives Matter protests.

In New Orleans, the police budget has actually increased significantly in 2022, from $178 million in 2021 to $215 million.

That’s about $570 per resident, which comes close to the city that spends the most per capita on police, New York, where the outlay for the police department at large is about $653 per resident.

Investigators search the crime scene of a shooting at Xavier University in New Orleans in May

Investigators search the crime scene of a shooting at Xavier University in New Orleans in May

Mayor LaToya Cantrell accuses a decades-old settlement with the Justice Department that he says has made it difficult to recruit new police officers under the federal microscope

Mayor LaToya Cantrell accuses a decades-old settlement with the Justice Department that he says has made it difficult to recruit new police officers under the federal microscope

New Orleans officials last week announced a three-year $80 million plan for all officers, free health care and $30,000 in stimulus payments for new employees, hoping to beef up their underfunded police department. .

Some in New Orleans have blamed rising crime rates on Mayor LaToya Cantrell, a Democrat who was re-elected last year, accusing him of failing to be tough on the crime.

But Cantrell blames a decades-old settlement with the Justice Department that she says has made it difficult to recruit new police officers under micro-scrutiny of its actions.

New Orleans is facing a police staffing crisis, with 1,000 police departments for the first time in modern history, down from more than 1,300 a few years ago.

City Council President Helena Moreno said in July that the city lost about 100 officers to retirement and resignation each year, about 10 percent of the current 989 force.

“You can’t run a department that is made up of about 1,400 officers when it has less than a thousand officers,” Moreno told a city council meeting. WWL TV,

New Orleans Police Superintendent Sean Ferguson spoke to reporters outside Federal Court in New Orleans last month after the city petitioned to end a decades-old consent decree giving federal oversight of its police department.

New Orleans Police Superintendent Sean Ferguson spoke to reporters outside Federal Court in New Orleans last month after the city petitioned to end a decades-old consent decree giving federal oversight of its police department.

The staffing crisis has been going on for a long time, a decade ago, when then-Mayor Mitch Landrieu imposed a two-year hiring freeze.

Landrieu, who took office in 2010, invited a Justice Department investigation into the city’s police department, a fresh investigation into the scandal-stricken department following deadly police shootings of civilians following Hurricane Katrina.

This led to a DOJ consent decree that was approved by a federal judge in January 2013, placing the city’s police under federal surveillance.

The agreement remains in effect nearly a decade later, and Cantrell has said that bureaucratic demands increase workloads and contribute to a decline in morale and manpower.

But a federal judge cast doubt on the city’s request to terminate the agreement during a status hearing last month.

Captain Michael Glasser, chief of the Police Association of New Orleans, said other factors are more damaging to the morale of rank-and-file officers.

He cited an overzealous ‘Bureau of Public Integrity’ – the police internal affairs agency that the police union has accused several times of using false information against officers.

Credit: www.dailymail.co.uk /

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