New York Governor Hochul says 3% of workers at hospitals and nursing homes were fired or resigned over refusing to get the COVID-19 vaccine ahead of the state’s mandate 

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  • New York Governor Cathy Hochul said 3% of health care workers in the state have been fired, resigned, retired or on vacation for not getting vaccinated.
  • This means that about 25,000 of the 845,000 people are no longer health care workers in New York.
  • In hospitals, 96% of workers have received at least one dose of the vaccine and in nursing homes, 97% have received at least one shot
  • Similarly, 96% of adult care facility workers and 94% of home health agency workers have received their initial dose of vaccine.
  • It comes a day after a judge ruled that employers must give religious exemptions to health care workers who apply for their

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New York Governor Cathy Hochul announced that a small percentage of health care workers have been fired or resigned after refusing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine ahead of the state’s mandate.

During a news briefing on Wednesday, Hochul revealed that 94 percent to 97 percent of employees in hospitals, nursing homes, adult care facilities and home health agencies received at least one dose since taking office in late August. Is.

However, not all workers have been inclined to get vaccinated, leading to some being let go or drop out.
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“We have numbers that show we are reducing the total workforce in these categories by three percent,” Hochul said during the briefing.

‘This includes those who have been dismissed, have resigned, those who have just decided to retire at that time, but also those who are on furlough who expect to see the outcome of the trial. are waiting.’

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This means that about 25,000 people are no longer health care workers in New York State.

The lawsuit Hochul talked about is in reference to a federal judge’s decision Tuesday that New York must grant health care workers a religious exemption to a vaccine mandate, which the state is appealing.

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New York Governor Kathy Hochul said during a press briefing on Wednesday (above) that 3% of health care workers in the state — about 25,000 people — were fired, resigned, for not vaccinated against COVID-19, retired or went on vacation.

In hospitals, 96% of workers have received at least one dose of the vaccine and in nursing homes, 97% have received at least one shot

In hospitals, 96% of workers have received at least one dose of the vaccine and in nursing homes, 97% have received at least one shot

New York’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for healthcare workers was split in two.

Previously 450,000 workers in hospitals and 145,400 workers in nursing homes were required to receive at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by Monday, Sept.

The mandate was announced in August by then-governor Andrew Cuomo, and was upheld when Hochul succeeded him.

It was one of the first – and largest – such mandates to be declared in the US.

Data shared by Hochul during the press briefing shows that the mandate was successful.

On August 24, when Hochul took office, 77 percent of the hospital’s staff had been fully vaccinated.

By the time the mandate came into force, 87 percent had been fully vaccinated. As of Wednesday, 96 percent have taken at least one dose.

Similarly, 71 percent of nursing home staff members had received at least one dose on August 24. By September 27, this figure had increased to 92 per cent.

At present, 97 percent of the employees have been given the initial dose of the vaccine.

“When someone is sick and they go to an urgent care center, they go to the hospital, they need help because they are in a debilitating physical condition,” Hochul said at the briefing.

‘They need To know that the person taking care of them will not pass on this deadly virus to them or their family members – and that has been the whole purpose behind this mandate.

‘It’s not something we wanted; This is something that this pandemic has forced us to do.

The data also showed that 96% of adult care facility workers and 94% of home health agency workers received their initial dose of vaccine.

The data also showed that 96% of adult care facility workers and 94% of home health agency workers received their initial dose of vaccine.

It comes a day after a judge ruled that employers must grant religious exemptions to health care workers applying for them.  Image: Sandra Lindsay (left) A nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, is vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine by D. Michelle Chester in December 2020 in Queens, New York.

It comes a day after a judge ruled that employers must grant religious exemptions to health care workers applying for them. Image: Sandra Lindsay (left) A nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, is vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine by D. Michelle Chester in December 2020 in Queens, New York.

The second part of the mandate saw home health care workers in assisted living homes, hospice care, treatment centers, AIDS home care programs, and more.

These groups, made up of about 250,000 people, had until October 7 to prove that they had received at least one dose of the vaccine, or risk exposure.

Hochul shared more data showing an increase in COVID vaccines in these groups as well.

Among workers in adult care facilities, 77 percent had received at least one dose by August 24, rising to 95 percent the day the mandate went into effect.

Among home health care agencies, 83 percent had received at least one dose by October 6 and 86 percent had received at least one dose by October 7.

As of Wednesday, 96 percent of adult care facility workers and 94 percent of home health agency workers have received the initial shot.

Additionally, Hochul said 0.5 percent of health workers currently have appointments for vaccinations so that they don’t lose their jobs.

‘The numbers speak for themselves. I think the mandate has inspired people to take the right decisions,’ she said.

Hochul recently suffered a setback in his attempt to uphold the vaccine mandate when a federal judge said on Tuesday that employers must grant religious exemptions to New York health care workers applying for them.

US District Judge David Hurd delivered the ruling after he filed suit against 17 Catholic and Baptist activists last month.

He said he objected to the use of embryonic cell lines in the development of vaccines.

Embryonic cell lines, which are lab-grown cells based on aborted embryonic cells collected in the 1970s and 1980s, were used for research and development of shots, but none are a component in aborted tissue vaccines .

Hearing the news of the ruling, Hochul vowed to fight the decision.

‘My responsibility as governor is to protect the people of this state, and…

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