New York man drives one-handed to rescue hawk that crashed into MTA bus


Only in New Hawk, kids.

A majestic red-tailed hawk was hit by an MTA bus this week but survived when a Good Samaritan tore a shirt off its back, wrapped the bird and carried it to a wildlife rescue while holding the bird with one hand .

“Don’t worry papi I’m going to make sure they take care of you,” said 37-year-old Juan M. Zorilla held the bird in one hand on Tuesday afternoon and asked it to be taken to the Wild Bird Fund on the Upper West. On the other hand, the video shows.

Zorilla told The Post that he was driving north on Broadway during a heavy rainstorm when the hawk “swooped down” right on top of his car and crashed into an MTA bus heading in the same direction.

“I got out of the car and saw the bird, took off my shirt, and proceeded to catch it,” explained Zorilla, a general contractor living in Manhattan.

Zorba the Red Tail Hawk is released back in Central Park
Zorba, the red-tailed falcon, is released back into Central Park.
Matthew McDermott

Luckily, this wasn’t Zorilla’s first wild encounter and he knew exactly what to do.

“This is not only my second encounter with a red-tailed hawk, but my previous encounters with other species,” Zorilla explained how he knows how to bring it to the Wild Bird Fund, which helps classify winged creatures. does. Who gets injured in the Big Apple.

When he arrived to the rescue, the hawk—which turned out to be a female, now called Zorba—was drenched with bones, but after a thorough examination and investigation, she was in fine shape, said Rita McMahon, fund. Director of.

Zorba was cared for by WBF animal care manager Ray Yampolsky.
Zorba was cared for by Wild Bird Fund Animal Care Manager Ray Yampolsky.
Matthew McDermott

“She was perfectly fine,” McMahon told The Post.

“The main finding was that she was too heavy and was caught in the storm as she was falling down.”

When asked about Zorilla’s hen-fighting methods, McMahon said he did the right thing by wrapping the bird and holding it “like an ice cream cone” at the base of its tail.

If he didn’t – “It would have been genius first,” McMahon said.

“The bird must be flying around in the car,” McMahon said of the hawk, which counts small dogs and cats among its prey.

Raptor rescuers let Zorba rest for two days and, after performing a “fly test” in the fund’s basement, she was ready to head back into the woods by Thursday afternoon.

Along with Zorilla, who placed Zorba inside a taped bounty paper towel cardboard box, McMahon helps her free the hen north of the Jacqueline Onassis Reservoir in Central Park.

Zorba is released back to Central Park with their 7-year-old son, Michael, with the help of Wild Bird Fund director Rita McMahon and Juan Zorilla.  Juan saved Zorba after hitting an MTA bus last week.
Zorba was released back to Central Park with their 7-year-old son, Michael, with the help of Wild Bird Fund director Rita McMahon and Juan Zorilla. Juan saved Zorba after hitting an MTA bus last week.
Matthew McDermott

“Tilt it a little. Let the bird fly by itself,” explained Zorilla, and Zorba spread his wings and flew toward the midday sun.

Zorilla took the cardboard box out of the park with her, just in case the wild event happens again.

“I’m getting better,” he said.

“Just taking it to the next bird.”

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