A New Jersey federal judge, whose son was killed by a deranged lawyer last year, revealed that the assailants were also keeping a watch on Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

FBI agents found the lawyer a dossier on Sotomayor in a locker belonging to Roy Dane Hollander, US District Judge Esther Salas told “60 Minutes,” in an interview aired Sunday.

Salas said on the CBS News program, “He got another gun, a gun, and more ammunition. But the most disturbing thing was working with Justice Sonia Sotomayor.”

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Sonia Sotomoyor, Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court, speaks at the Mississippi Book Festival in Jackson, Miss on 17 August 2019.  (AP Photo / Rogelio V. Solis)

Sonia Sotomoyor, Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court, speaks at the Mississippi Book Festival in Jackson, Miss on 17 August 2019. (AP Photo / Rogelio V. Solis)

Authorities have said Dan Hollander, an anti-feminist, racist Manhattan lawyer, was introduced as a FedEx delivery man in an ambush at Salas’ New Brunswick home on July 19.

The insane lawyer killed Salas’s 20-year-old son, Daniel Anderle, and badly injured her husband Mark Anderle.

At the time of the shooting, the judge was overseeing a case, with Dan Hollander arguing that the all-male military draft was discriminatory. Investigators said they argued against Sala in writing and used racist and sexist words to humiliate him.

72-year-old Dan Hollander was found dead from a self-immolating gunshot the day after the attack.

Authorities also searched a document with Dan Hollander containing information on a dozen female judges from across the country, half of whom are Latina, including Salas, the Associated Press previously reported.

Sotomayor’s information includes his “favorite restaurants where he worked, his friends,” Salas described as “60 Minutes”.

Learning that Dan Hollander was judged that his sights were “chilling”, he said.

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“Who knows what could have happened?” Brother in law said.

Since the murder of his son, Salas has been pushing for greater privacy protection for judges, including scrutinizing personal information from the Internet, to deal with the escalating cyber attack.

“We need to understand that judges are at risk,” she said. “We put ourselves in great danger every day to do our work.”

Both the Supreme Court and FBI declined to comment on his statements.

“We do not discuss security under court policy,” court spokesman Kathy Arberg said.