Nuking an incoming asteroid COULD actually work: Detonating a one MEGATONNE nuclear bomb would stop 99% of a space rock hitting Earth if it appeared out of the blue, study suggests 

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  • NASA simulates the risk of a large asteroid hitting Earth every other year
  • This year he won the 2021 PDC. tracked the path of the imaginary 329 feet of space rock called
  • A team of scientists then modeled nuclear weapons firing on this asteroid.
  • They found that even two months before it hit, nuclear firing could have prevented the disaster.
  • It will destroy space rock, and will not collide with Earth, tracking down the pieces found

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According to a new study, firing a nuclear warhead at an asteroid on a collision course with Earth could prevent 99 percent of its collisions on the planet.

Every two years the Center for Near Earth Object Studies at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California runs a simulation on the aftermath of an asteroid impact.

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In this year’s scenario, a hypothetical 329 ft (100 m) asteroid, called 2021 PDC, was not detected until only six months after it collided with the planet – a nudge to give it a nudge. There was not enough time to send the spacecraft or take any action on it. planet to save many lives.

However, new research from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, found that a megaton atom, detonating near the asteroid’s surface, would destroy thousands of larger fragments still heading for Earth without it.

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“If we use a robust nuclear disintegration technique until at least a month before the impact, we can prevent 99 percent or more of the impacted mass from hitting Earth,” said study lead author Patrick King. gizmodo.

According to a new study (stock image), firing a nuclear warhead at an asteroid on a collision course with Earth could prevent 99 percent of the planet from colliding.

how will it work

A large one megaton nuclear bomb will be fired at an asteroid traveling from Earth to planet.

It is 50 times more powerful than Little Boy, which was dropped by the US on Hiroshima in 1945.

It will be set to explode just above the surface of the asteroid.

This would send out a shockwave that would tear the space rock apart, breaking it into thousands of smaller pieces.

Experts tracked the likely trajectory and found that if the atom went up two months before the rock hit Earth, 99 percent of the fragments would be missed by the planet.

It is likely that the one percent that arrived will break into the Earth’s atmosphere, causing no harm.

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It is an idea that has become a staple of Hollywood disaster films, most famously in the 1998 film Armageddon, in which Bruce Willis and a crew of deep-core drillers are sent to blow up a giant oncoming asteroid.

Unlike Armageddon, the Johns Hopkins University team believes it would be enough to just fire a nuclear at the asteroid from the ground – there’s no need to get Willis out of retirement.

This isn’t the first time NASA, or other planetary scientists, have investigated the idea of ​​using a single atom to destroy an incoming asteroid, but the team looked at the possible path of several resulting fragments.

Previously, it was thought that even if we succeeded in blowing up a large space rock, a few fragments would be enough to destroy cities and cause mass destruction.

A NASA-funded mock exercise in May found that even firing a nuclear one at a space rock six months before hitting Earth wouldn’t bring it down.

However, the Johns Hopkins team disputes these findings, taking a much closer look at the fragments caused by the nuclear explosion and its ‘going up’.

To understand the true path of the fragments from the destroyed asteroid, the team simulated their resulting orbit and trajectory, tracking them through their resulting orbit around the Sun, from the detonation of a megaton atom.

The team included the effect the gravity of other planets in the inner solar system, such as Venus and Mars, might have on their trajectories and whether it might have caused them to collide with Earth.

Their simulation found that this massive bomb, 50 times more powerful than the Little Boy that destroyed Hiroshima in WW2, would have been ignited near the surface of the space rock 328 feet (100 m) on its way to Earth. Will do the trick

They tested their findings at five different distances from the planet, finding that it worked in all cases – so would be a viable option for last-minute arrivals.

Obviously, the more the atom is removed from the impact, the better, because it further reduces the amount of incoming material, they found.

However, a new study from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland found that a one megaton atom, detonating near the asteroid's surface, would still destroy it without leaving thousands of massive fragments for Earth (stock image)

However, a new study from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland found that a one megaton atom, detonating near the asteroid’s surface, would still destroy it without leaving thousands of massive fragments for Earth (stock image)

Explained: The difference between an asteroid, meteorite and other space rocks

One small star There is a large chunk of rock left over from collisions or the early Solar System. Most are located between Mars and Jupiter in the main belt.

a comet Ice is a rock covered with methane and other compounds. Their orbits take them far beyond the Solar System.

a Meteor Astronomers call a flash of light in the atmosphere when debris burns up.

This debris only a. is referred to as Meteorite. Most are so small that they evaporate into the atmosphere.

If any of these meteorites hit Earth, it would be given a . is called Meteorite.

Meteorites, meteorites and meteorites usually originate from asteroids and comets.

For example, if Earth passes through the tail of a comet, most of the debris burns up in the atmosphere, creating a meteor shower.

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The bigger the asteroid for the planet, the more advance you’ll need to fire the atom to confine the larger pieces to still causing untold damage.

It’s still possible for a large asteroid to miss 99 percent of the resulting fragments from Earth, but you’d need to hit it six months earlier, rather than a month or two with a smaller rock.

‘We employed a number of conjectures to make the study feasible, but we believe …

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