One in ten British people will have diabetes by 2030: Shock warning as obesity crisis doubles the number with the disease 

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  • Diabetes levels have doubled in the past 15 years as a result of obesity rates
  • If this rate continues, 5.5 million Britons will be living with diabetes over the next decade
  • The charity projects an estimated 87,000 hospital admissions by the year 2030

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Experts warned yesterday that one in ten adults is likely to have diabetes by 2030, as the country faces a ‘ticking timebomb’.

The charity Diabetes UK said diabetes levels have doubled in the past 15 years as a result of rising obesity rates, creating a ‘public health emergency’.

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If this rate continues, 5.5 million Britons will be living with diabetes by the next decade, putting continued pressure on the NHS.

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About 4.1 million patients in the UK are diagnosed with diabetes, and more than 850,000 have been diagnosed with the disease.

The charity’s analysis estimates 87,000 hospitalizations are projected each year by 2030 – 10,000 more than now.

The NHS already spends £14 billion a year on the care and treatment of people with diabetes, and experts have warned that the crisis threatens to ‘bankrupt the NHS’.

About 4.1 million patients in the UK have been diagnosed with diabetes, and more than 850,000 people are thought to have the disease without knowing it.

Nine out of ten people with diabetes have type 2, which is associated with obesity and unhealthy lives.

Type 1 is an irreversible autoimmune disease that usually develops in childhood.

Diabetes occurs when blood-sugar levels become dangerously high. This can lead to complications including heart attack, kidney failure, stroke, amputation and blindness.

Diabetes UK chief executive Chris Askew said the nation was ‘at the peak of a public health emergency’.

The charity claims that one in three adults – more than 17 million – could be at increased risk of developing type 2 by 2030.

Its data is based on the diabetes prevalence projection model from Public Health England and the Association of Public Health Observatories.

Diabetes UK would like to see action to tackle rising obesity rates and keep people with type 2 in remission, including a ‘soup and shake’ diet and tailored weight loss programs such as gastric-band surgery.

Its data is based on the diabetes prevalence projection model from Public Health England and the Association of Public Health Observatories.

Its data is based on the diabetes prevalence projection model from Public Health England and the Association of Public Health Observatories.

How much sugar is too much?

How much sugar a person should eat in a day depends on how old he is.

Children between the ages of four and six should be limited to a maximum of 19 grams per day.

Children ages seven to 10 should have no more than 24 grams, and children over age 11 should have 30 grams or less.

Meanwhile the NHS advises that adults should consume no more than 30 grams of free sugars a day.

Popular snacks contain surprising amounts of sugar, and even a can of Coca-Cola (35 grams of sugar) or a Mars bar (33 grams) may contain more than the maximum amount of sugar a child can consume in an entire day. Is.

A bowl of Frosties has 24 grams of sugar, which means that a 10-year-old who has Frosties for breakfast has probably reached his limit the day before he leaves the house.

Children who eat a lot of sugar are at risk of damaging their teeth, putting on fat and being overweight, and developing type 2 diabetes, which increases the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Source: NHS

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It also says more people should be enrolled in the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme, which aims to help them reach a healthy weight, learn to eat better and make regular exercise a part of their daily lives.

Mr Askew said: ‘Every diagnosis of diabetes is life changing. The relentlessness of the condition and the current fear of serious and life-altering complications is a life-long reality for millions of families.

‘It is a serious thought that if we do not take action today, hundreds of thousands of people will be faced with the life-changing news that they have type 2 diabetes.

‘We are at the peak of a public health emergency and action is needed today to stop it on its track.’

He added: ‘It doesn’t have to be this way. We know that with the right care and support, complications of diabetes can be avoided and cases of type 2 can be remitted or prevented altogether.

‘We do not want our prediction to become a reality. We need to see the will, grit and determination of the government to stop this crisis and improve the future health of our country for the generations to come.

Tam Fry, president of the National Obesity Forum, said: ‘Twenty years ago, about 10 percent of the population was obese, leading to diabetes and other serious health conditions.

‘Obesity was designated as a “ticking timebomb” by England’s chief medical officer, but the government did nothing to deactivate it.’

The latest NHS figures show every week, diabetes leads to 185 amputations, over 770 strokes, 590 heart attacks and 2,300 heart failure cases.

Professor Jonathan Vallabhji, the national clinical director of diabetes and obesity at NHS England, said: ‘Diabetes can have a significant impact on people’s lives, at high risk of heart attack, stroke, organ loss, many common forms of cancer and more. with. dire consequences with covid-19.

Diabetes UK says more people should be enrolled in the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme, which aims to help them reach a healthy weight, learn to eat better and make regular exercise a part of their daily lives.

Diabetes UK says more people should be enrolled in the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme, which aims to help them reach a healthy weight, learn to eat better and make regular exercise a part of their daily lives.

‘As part of its long-term plan, the NHS is already providing the world’s largest type 2 diabetes prevention program to help people reduce their risk of developing the condition, as well as those in Use of low calorie diet can be administered. Was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes to achieve remission.’

One study shows that children who are more fit perform better than their peers in cognitive tasks.

The study found healthy elementary students who ran the furthest on a fitness test completed visual, reading…

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