Paul Scholes reveals he feared his non-verbal autistic son, 16, would have to go into care after some ‘terrible times’ as he opens up in Paddy McGuinness BBC documentary 

- Advertisement -


  • Paul Scholes talks Paddy McGuinness in his new BBC documentary
  • Scholes’ autistic son Aiden, 16, is non-verbal and has complex needs
  • Talks of ‘terrible times’ and says she fears she will have to take care of her son
  • But the football star said Aiden is now a ‘happy boy’ who is doing ‘amazing’

- Advertisement -

Football star Paul Scholes has admitted he struggled to come to terms with his son’s autism diagnosis and at one point feared he would have to go into care.

The former England and Manchester United player said 16-year-old Aiden is non-verbal and has complex needs that have led to some ‘terrible, terrible times’.

advertisement

Speaking to Paddy McGuinness, whose three children are all autistic, Scholes, 47, said: ‘After being diagnosed for those first few years, I kept thinking he was just delayed, eventually he would start talking. .

‘That’s never going to happen. He’s never going to get mad. But he is great. You have to accept it.’

- Advertisement -

Football star Paul Scholes has admitted he struggled to come to terms with his son’s autism diagnosis and at one point feared he would have to go into care. Scholes with his children, Aaron (Right), Alicia and Aiden at Old Trafford in August 2011

The former England and Manchester United player said 16-year-old Aiden is non-verbal and has complex needs that have led to some 'terrible, terrible times'.

The former England and Manchester United player said 16-year-old Aiden is non-verbal and has complex needs that have led to some ‘terrible, terrible times’.

Paddy McGuinness, 48, interviews Scholes for her documentary Paddy and Christine McGuinness: Our Family and Autism, which airs tonight on BBC1, shown in the picture

Paddy McGuinness, 48, interviews Scholes for her documentary Paddy and Christine McGuinness: Our Family and Autism, which airs tonight on BBC1, shown in the picture

McGuinness, 48, interviewed Scholes for his documentary Paddy and Christine McGuinness: Our Family and Autism, which airs tonight on BBC1.

Paul, who shares 21-year-old Aaron and 20-year-old Alicia with wife Claire, explained that he initially kept his son’s diagnosis private, even from the team and coaching staff at Manchester United.

‘When we got the diagnosis, we would’ [Manchester United] Playing derby away. I was shocked,’ he recalled.

I didn’t want to stay there. My mind was gone, I was worrying about autism, reading about autism, trying to find everything I could. I was terrible.

‘I remember playing Wednesday night and we got to the next game on Saturday and the manager pulled me in and said, “I’m leaving you today. How do you think you did the other night?” And I said, “I wasn’t good enough.” I never told them, I never told anyone.’

Scholes, who has renounced the celebrity lifestyle enjoyed by other footballers, made Aiden’s diagnosis public in his 2011 memoir, Scholes: My Story.

Paul explained that he initially kept his son's diagnosis private, even from the team and coaching staff at Manchester United.  Above, hugging Aiden in a video shared on Instagram

Paul explained that he initially kept his son’s diagnosis private, even from the team and coaching staff at Manchester United. Above, hugging Aiden in a video shared on Instagram

He told Paddy about some of the difficulties he faced as a result of this situation.

‘You’re trying to cut her hair, I’ve put her in a headlock. This is absurd. He is cutting your hand. You couldn’t wear t-shirts because me and Claire, we were full of scratches all the way [our arms],

‘And you don’t know what’s causing it, you have no idea. You learn to start looking for signals, I guess, then you stop at the source before it happens.’

He continued: ‘He used to come home and he would go ballistics every day. We used to just let him out and watch him because the garden is closed. He’s going ballistic, he’s punching, he’s kicking, he’s screaming.

Scholes told Paddy about some of the difficulties that resulted from the situation.  Photo of Aiden in a photo shared on Scholes' Instagram account

Scholes told Paddy about some of the difficulties that resulted from the situation. Photo of Aiden in a photo shared on Scholes’ Instagram account

The proud father of three Scholes on a walk with his daughter Alicia and son Aiden, pictured

The proud father of three Scholes on a walk with his daughter Alicia and son Aiden, pictured

‘ And – I’ve never said this before – I keep looking at him thinking, “He might have to go into care”. I don’t know how you handle it.’

Although Scholes said Aiden has reached milestones, such as being more experimental with food.

He continued: ‘We spent some terrible, terrible times with him. But as wonderful as he is now, he is a happy boy. Time will come but… people look at you completely differently but you just have to think, “F*** them, I don’t care what they think”.

After their conversation, Paddy said: ‘The biggest thing he said really resonated, it’s about not caring what people think. I don’t care what people think, but apparently I do, because I get upset.

Paddy, 48, and wife Christine, 33, live in Cheshire with their three children, eight-year-old twins Leo and Penelope, and five-year-old Felicity, who all have autism.

Paddy, 48, and wife Christine, 33, live in Cheshire with their three children, eight-year-old twins Leo and Penelope, and five-year-old Felicity, who all have autism.

Speaking in a new BBC documentary, the father of three admitted that he initially struggled with the diagnosis and Christine explained how she threw herself into work and made money to support the family. Tried to face  He gets emotional while discussing the condition

Speaking in a new BBC documentary, the father of three admitted that he initially struggled with the diagnosis and Christine explained how she threw herself into work and made money to support the family. Tried to face He gets emotional while discussing the condition

‘If someone mentioned the word autism to me I would say “I don’t want to talk about it, I don’t want to think about it”. Now I am finally talking about autism, I wish I had not spent so much time in the fear of all this.

Paddy, 48, and wife Christine, 33, live in Cheshire with their three children, eight-year-old twins Leo and Penelope, and five-year-old Felicity, who all have autism.

Speaking in a new BBC documentary, the father of three admitted that he initially struggled with the diagnosis and Christine explained how she threw herself into work and made money to support the family. Tried to face

During filming, Christine learns that she too has autism. Paddy embarks on a journey to better understand the neurological condition and how it can affect the lives of his children.

During filming, Christine, pictured with one of her daughters, learns that she too has autism.

During filming, Christine, pictured with one of her daughters, learns that she too has autism. Paddy sets out on a journey to better understand neurological condition

One of Paddy's major concerns is that he fears the struggle to understand and understand his children's feelings can mean they don't know how much he loves them.

One of Paddy’s major concerns is that he fears the struggle to understand and understand his children’s feelings can mean they don’t know how much…

,

- Advertisement -
Mail Us For  DMCA / Credit  Notice

Recent Articles

Stay on top - Get the daily news in your inbox

Related Stories